Agatho 2 (Male) I, pope, 678-681
l vii-l viii

Factoid List

Recorded Name (28)
Agatho (26)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  Cap29
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  29
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  Cap31
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  31
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  32
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  43 (p. 88)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  44
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  45
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  46
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  47 (p. 96)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  51
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  52
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  53 (p. 112)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  54 (p. 116)
 Anon.VitCeolfrithi  16
 Bede.HistAb  6
 Bede.HE  iv.18
 Bede.HE  v.19
 S72   
 S1246   
 S1428a   
 ASC (E)  675 E (p. 35)
 ASC (DEF)  963 E (p. 116)
 Agatho.Ep.B38   
 Agatho.Ep.B48  p. 74
 Agatho.Ep.B55   
Agathonus (1)
 S66   
Agato (1)
 Agatho.Ep.B56  p. 89
Personal Information (18)
piety (5)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  54 (p. 116) (of apostolic memory)
 Agatho.Ep.B38    (servant of the servants of God)
 Agatho.Ep.B48  p. 74 (servant of the servants of God)
 Agatho.Ep.B55    (servant of the servant of God)
 Agatho.Ep.B56    (servant of the servants of God)
saintly status (13)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  Cap29 (most blessed)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  29 (most blessed)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  29 (most holy and thrice-blessed)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  46 (holy)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  46 (most holy)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  46 (holy)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  47 (p. 96) (holy)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  51 (holy)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  52 (thrice blessed)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  53 (p. 114) (blessed)
 Bede.HE  iv.18 (of blessed memory)
 Bede.HE  v.19 (of blessed memory)
 S72    (holy)
Authorship (11)
 Author of papal decrees sent to Britain (Papal decree): Stephen.VitWilfridi  46
 Author of papal decrees [sent to Britain] (Papal decree): Stephen.VitWilfridi  51
 Author of papal judgments (Papal decree): Stephen.VitWilfridi  52
 Author of papal judgments about [Wilfrid 2] (Papal decree): Stephen.VitWilfridi  53 (p. 114)
 Author of a grant to Wearmouth of privileges of non-interference (Letter): Bede.HistAb  6
 Author of a letter to England (Letter): ASC (E)  675 E
 Author of a confirmation of the freedom of the minster at Medeshamstead [= Peterborough Abbey] from king and bishop (Charter): ASC (DEF)  963 E (p. 116)
 Author of a letter to Hadrian 3 (Letter): Agatho.Ep.B38   
 Author of a letter to Theodore 1 and Seaxwulf 1 (Letter): Agatho.Ep.B48  pp. 74-9
 Author of a letter to Eorcenwald 1 (Letter): Agatho.Ep.B55   
 Author of a letter to Eorcenwald 1 (Letter): Agatho.Ep.B56  pp. 89-91
Office (34)
Bishop (5)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  29 (Bishop of the holy catholic and apostolic church of the city of Rome)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi    (most holy bishop)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  31 (most holy and thrice blessed bishop of the holy catholic and apostolic church of the city of Rome)
 Agatho.Ep.B38   
 Agatho.Ep.B56  p. 89
Pope (29)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  29 (Pope of the Apostolic See)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  29 (your Pontifical Holiness)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  30 (apostolic eminence)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  30 (your pontifical eminence)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  30 (your apostolic eminence)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  32 (most holy and thrice blessed...apostolic father)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  43 (p. 88) (pontiff)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  46
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  47
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  51 (most blessed pope)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  52 (thrice blessed)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  53 (thrice blessed)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  53 (most blessed)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  53 (blessed ... protector of the apostolic see)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  54 (of apostolic memory ... pope)
 Stephen.VitWilfridi  54 (most blessed)
 Anon.VitCeolfrithi  16
 Anon.VitCeolfrithi  20
 Bede.HistAb  6
 Bede.HE  iv.18
 Bede.HE  v.19
 S66   
 S72   
 S1246   
 S1428a   
 ASC (E)  675 E (p. 35)
 ASC (DEF)  963 E (p. 116)
 Agatho.Ep.B55   
 WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  i.1.4
Personal Relationship (6)
~ Beloved (General relationship) of Agatho 2 (1)
 Eorcenwald 1: of Agatho 2: Agatho.Ep.B55   
~ Brother (Honorific kinship) of Agatho 2 (2)
 Theodore 1: of Agatho 2: Agatho.Ep.B48  p. 74
 Seaxwulf 1: of Agatho 2: Agatho.Ep.B48  p. 74
Agatho 2 Predecessor (General relationship) of ~ (1)
 of John 17: Stephen.VitWilfridi  54 (p. 117)
~ Son (Honorific kinship) of Agatho 2 (2)
 Æthelred 2: of Agatho 2: Agatho.Ep.B48  p. 74
 Æthelred 2: of Agatho 2: Agatho.Ep.B48  p.74
Event (35)
Accusation (1)
 Wilfrid 2-Ecgfrith 4.conflict: So long as the blessed Æthelthryth 2 shared Ecgfrith 4's bed, she strove to keep Wilfrid 2 on good terms with her husband. But Ecgfrith 4's new wife, Eormenburg 1, stirred up hostility to the bishop on the grounds of his great wealth and influence. On hearing that, Archbishop Theodore 1 took measures against Wilfrid 2. Wilfrid 2 went to the Continent to appeal to the pope. In his absence Æthelred 2, king of the Mercians and Wulfhere 1's brother, began a campaign against the Northumbrians to avenge the injuries done to his brother. He put Ecgfrith 4 to flight, slaying his brother Ælfwine 4. Æthelred 2 then banished Bishop Wynnfrith 1, successor of Chad 1 at Lichfield, because he had favoured Ecgfrith 4. Wynnfrith 1, driven by chance on to the coast of the Gaul, came upon King Theoderic 2 and Ebroin 1 duke of the Franks. They had received instructions from Britain to seize and despoil Bishop Wilfrid 2. Mistaken by the name, they killed Wynnfrith 1's company, Anonymi 337 and took away his property, though they let him get away. Meanwhile, Wilfrid 2 befriended Aldgisl 1 and converted him to Christianity; then he moved to Dagobert 3. Dagobert 3 offered Wilfrid 2 the see of Strasbourg, but the latter put off an answer till he should come back from Rome, and Dagobert 3 sent him freely on his way in the company of bishop Deodatus 1. On their way they encountered Perctarit 1, who first wanted to harm Wilfrid 2, but when he heard the true story he helped Wilfrid 2 to crown his business with success. Finally, he arrived to Rome. There had arrived earlier from Theodore 1 a monk of impeccable devoutness, one Cenwald 1, with written accusations against the bishop. Disturbed by this, Pope Agatho 2 summoned a council of fifty bishops and abbots. Andrew 1 and John 10 were present; John 12 kept the records. The council decided that Wilfrid 2's bishopric should be restored to him. Wilfrid 2 then returned to Britain, obtained audience of Ecgfrith 4 and gave him the papal decree. The king, however, showed no respect for the see of Rome, robbed the bishop of his property and handed him over to a certain reeve Osfrith 2, a man notorious for his cruelty. The court itched to do Wilfrid 2 some injury, and Eormenburg 1 went as far as to seize the bishop’s reliquary from him by force and carried it around, relics and all, on her neck or in her carriage. Osfrith 2 put the bishop into a dark prison, but through its darkness a light burst to shine on Wilfrid 2. The reeve was in fear when he heard about it, but he was even more afraid of Ecgfrith 4. Meanwhile his wife [Æbbe 1] grew very ill, first foaming at the mouth and then becoming paralyzed; Osfrith 2 threw himself at the bishop’s feet, and his wife’s health was restored; he then begged the king not to impose on him the guilt of punishing the innocent bishop. Ecgfrith 4 then passed Wilfrid 2 on to a more cruel man called Tydlin 1, who ordered the bishop to be chained – but the chains kept slipping off Wilfrid 2’s hands. The king and his wife continued to ignore these signs and treated the bishop with scorn and hostility, keeping him under arrest. But one night, on a visit from Ecgfrith 4’s aunt, Abbess Æbbe 2, Eormenburg 1 was seized with the Devil. The abbess understood what had happened and prevailed upon her nephew to restore the blessed man’s reliquary. To restore his spouse’s health, the king had to allow Wilfrid 2 to go free. The queen made a good recovery; later, after her husband’s death, she took the habit and was a religious repented of what she had done. : WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  iii.100.32-101.10
Advice/counsel (1)
 Wilfrid 2-Ecgfrith 4.conflict: So long as the blessed Æthelthryth 2 shared Ecgfrith 4's bed, she strove to keep Wilfrid 2 on good terms with her husband. But Ecgfrith 4's new wife, Eormenburg 1, stirred up hostility to the bishop on the grounds of his great wealth and influence. On hearing that, Archbishop Theodore 1 took measures against Wilfrid 2. Wilfrid 2 went to the Continent to appeal to the pope. In his absence Æthelred 2, king of the Mercians and Wulfhere 1's brother, began a campaign against the Northumbrians to avenge the injuries done to his brother. He put Ecgfrith 4 to flight, slaying his brother Ælfwine 4. Æthelred 2 then banished Bishop Wynnfrith 1, successor of Chad 1 at Lichfield, because he had favoured Ecgfrith 4. Wynnfrith 1, driven by chance on to the coast of the Gaul, came upon King Theoderic 2 and Ebroin 1 duke of the Franks. They had received instructions from Britain to seize and despoil Bishop Wilfrid 2. Mistaken by the name, they killed Wynnfrith 1's company, Anonymi 337 and took away his property, though they let him get away. Meanwhile, Wilfrid 2 befriended Aldgisl 1 and converted him to Christianity; then he moved to Dagobert 3. Dagobert 3 offered Wilfrid 2 the see of Strasbourg, but the latter put off an answer till he should come back from Rome, and Dagobert 3 sent him freely on his way in the company of bishop Deodatus 1. On their way they encountered Perctarit 1, who first wanted to harm Wilfrid 2, but when he heard the true story he helped Wilfrid 2 to crown his business with success. Finally, he arrived to Rome. There had arrived earlier from Theodore 1 a monk of impeccable devoutness, one Cenwald 1, with written accusations against the bishop. Disturbed by this, Pope Agatho 2 summoned a council of fifty bishops and abbots. Andrew 1 and John 10 were present; John 12 kept the records. The council decided that Wilfrid 2's bishopric should be restored to him. Wilfrid 2 then returned to Britain, obtained audience of Ecgfrith 4 and gave him the papal decree. The king, however, showed no respect for the see of Rome, robbed the bishop of his property and handed him over to a certain reeve Osfrith 2, a man notorious for his cruelty. The court itched to do Wilfrid 2 some injury, and Eormenburg 1 went as far as to seize the bishop’s reliquary from him by force and carried it around, relics and all, on her neck or in her carriage. Osfrith 2 put the bishop into a dark prison, but through its darkness a light burst to shine on Wilfrid 2. The reeve was in fear when he heard about it, but he was even more afraid of Ecgfrith 4. Meanwhile his wife [Æbbe 1] grew very ill, first foaming at the mouth and then becoming paralyzed; Osfrith 2 threw himself at the bishop’s feet, and his wife’s health was restored; he then begged the king not to impose on him the guilt of punishing the innocent bishop. Ecgfrith 4 then passed Wilfrid 2 on to a more cruel man called Tydlin 1, who ordered the bishop to be chained – but the chains kept slipping off Wilfrid 2’s hands. The king and his wife continued to ignore these signs and treated the bishop with scorn and hostility, keeping him under arrest. But one night, on a visit from Ecgfrith 4’s aunt, Abbess Æbbe 2, Eormenburg 1 was seized with the Devil. The abbess understood what had happened and prevailed upon her nephew to restore the blessed man’s reliquary. To restore his spouse’s health, the king had to allow Wilfrid 2 to go free. The queen made a good recovery; later, after her husband’s death, she took the habit and was a religious repented of what she had done. : WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  iii.100.32-101.10
Arrest (1)
 Wilfrid 2-Ecgfrith 4.conflict: So long as the blessed Æthelthryth 2 shared Ecgfrith 4's bed, she strove to keep Wilfrid 2 on good terms with her husband. But Ecgfrith 4's new wife, Eormenburg 1, stirred up hostility to the bishop on the grounds of his great wealth and influence. On hearing that, Archbishop Theodore 1 took measures against Wilfrid 2. Wilfrid 2 went to the Continent to appeal to the pope. In his absence Æthelred 2, king of the Mercians and Wulfhere 1's brother, began a campaign against the Northumbrians to avenge the injuries done to his brother. He put Ecgfrith 4 to flight, slaying his brother Ælfwine 4. Æthelred 2 then banished Bishop Wynnfrith 1, successor of Chad 1 at Lichfield, because he had favoured Ecgfrith 4. Wynnfrith 1, driven by chance on to the coast of the Gaul, came upon King Theoderic 2 and Ebroin 1 duke of the Franks. They had received instructions from Britain to seize and despoil Bishop Wilfrid 2. Mistaken by the name, they killed Wynnfrith 1's company, Anonymi 337 and took away his property, though they let him get away. Meanwhile, Wilfrid 2 befriended Aldgisl 1 and converted him to Christianity; then he moved to Dagobert 3. Dagobert 3 offered Wilfrid 2 the see of Strasbourg, but the latter put off an answer till he should come back from Rome, and Dagobert 3 sent him freely on his way in the company of bishop Deodatus 1. On their way they encountered Perctarit 1, who first wanted to harm Wilfrid 2, but when he heard the true story he helped Wilfrid 2 to crown his business with success. Finally, he arrived to Rome. There had arrived earlier from Theodore 1 a monk of impeccable devoutness, one Cenwald 1, with written accusations against the bishop. Disturbed by this, Pope Agatho 2 summoned a council of fifty bishops and abbots. Andrew 1 and John 10 were present; John 12 kept the records. The council decided that Wilfrid 2's bishopric should be restored to him. Wilfrid 2 then returned to Britain, obtained audience of Ecgfrith 4 and gave him the papal decree. The king, however, showed no respect for the see of Rome, robbed the bishop of his property and handed him over to a certain reeve Osfrith 2, a man notorious for his cruelty. The court itched to do Wilfrid 2 some injury, and Eormenburg 1 went as far as to seize the bishop’s reliquary from him by force and carried it around, relics and all, on her neck or in her carriage. Osfrith 2 put the bishop into a dark prison, but through its darkness a light burst to shine on Wilfrid 2. The reeve was in fear when he heard about it, but he was even more afraid of Ecgfrith 4. Meanwhile his wife [Æbbe 1] grew very ill, first foaming at the mouth and then becoming paralyzed; Osfrith 2 threw himself at the bishop’s feet, and his wife’s health was restored; he then begged the king not to impose on him the guilt of punishing the innocent bishop. Ecgfrith 4 then passed Wilfrid 2 on to a more cruel man called Tydlin 1, who ordered the bishop to be chained – but the chains kept slipping off Wilfrid 2’s hands. The king and his wife continued to ignore these signs and treated the bishop with scorn and hostility, keeping him under arrest. But one night, on a visit from Ecgfrith 4’s aunt, Abbess Æbbe 2, Eormenburg 1 was seized with the Devil. The abbess understood what had happened and prevailed upon her nephew to restore the blessed man’s reliquary. To restore his spouse’s health, the king had to allow Wilfrid 2 to go free. The queen made a good recovery; later, after her husband’s death, she took the habit and was a religious repented of what she had done. : WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  iii.100.32-101.10
Assembly (1)
 Anonymi 1322.confirmation of letter of Agatho 2: They [sc. Anonymi 1322] granted and confirmed completely the letter sent by the pope [sc. Agatho 2].: ASC (E)  675 E
Assistance (1)
 Wilfrid 2-Ecgfrith 4.conflict: So long as the blessed Æthelthryth 2 shared Ecgfrith 4's bed, she strove to keep Wilfrid 2 on good terms with her husband. But Ecgfrith 4's new wife, Eormenburg 1, stirred up hostility to the bishop on the grounds of his great wealth and influence. On hearing that, Archbishop Theodore 1 took measures against Wilfrid 2. Wilfrid 2 went to the Continent to appeal to the pope. In his absence Æthelred 2, king of the Mercians and Wulfhere 1's brother, began a campaign against the Northumbrians to avenge the injuries done to his brother. He put Ecgfrith 4 to flight, slaying his brother Ælfwine 4. Æthelred 2 then banished Bishop Wynnfrith 1, successor of Chad 1 at Lichfield, because he had favoured Ecgfrith 4. Wynnfrith 1, driven by chance on to the coast of the Gaul, came upon King Theoderic 2 and Ebroin 1 duke of the Franks. They had received instructions from Britain to seize and despoil Bishop Wilfrid 2. Mistaken by the name, they killed Wynnfrith 1's company, Anonymi 337 and took away his property, though they let him get away. Meanwhile, Wilfrid 2 befriended Aldgisl 1 and converted him to Christianity; then he moved to Dagobert 3. Dagobert 3 offered Wilfrid 2 the see of Strasbourg, but the latter put off an answer till he should come back from Rome, and Dagobert 3 sent him freely on his way in the company of bishop Deodatus 1. On their way they encountered Perctarit 1, who first wanted to harm Wilfrid 2, but when he heard the true story he helped Wilfrid 2 to crown his business with success. Finally, he arrived to Rome. There had arrived earlier from Theodore 1 a monk of impeccable devoutness, one Cenwald 1, with written accusations against the bishop. Disturbed by this, Pope Agatho 2 summoned a council of fifty bishops and abbots. Andrew 1 and John 10 were present; John 12 kept the records. The council decided that Wilfrid 2's bishopric should be restored to him. Wilfrid 2 then returned to Britain, obtained audience of Ecgfrith 4 and gave him the papal decree. The king, however, showed no respect for the see of Rome, robbed the bishop of his property and handed him over to a certain reeve Osfrith 2, a man notorious for his cruelty. The court itched to do Wilfrid 2 some injury, and Eormenburg 1 went as far as to seize the bishop’s reliquary from him by force and carried it around, relics and all, on her neck or in her carriage. Osfrith 2 put the bishop into a dark prison, but through its darkness a light burst to shine on Wilfrid 2. The reeve was in fear when he heard about it, but he was even more afraid of Ecgfrith 4. Meanwhile his wife [Æbbe 1] grew very ill, first foaming at the mouth and then becoming paralyzed; Osfrith 2 threw himself at the bishop’s feet, and his wife’s health was restored; he then begged the king not to impose on him the guilt of punishing the innocent bishop. Ecgfrith 4 then passed Wilfrid 2 on to a more cruel man called Tydlin 1, who ordered the bishop to be chained – but the chains kept slipping off Wilfrid 2’s hands. The king and his wife continued to ignore these signs and treated the bishop with scorn and hostility, keeping him under arrest. But one night, on a visit from Ecgfrith 4’s aunt, Abbess Æbbe 2, Eormenburg 1 was seized with the Devil. The abbess understood what had happened and prevailed upon her nephew to restore the blessed man’s reliquary. To restore his spouse’s health, the king had to allow Wilfrid 2 to go free. The queen made a good recovery; later, after her husband’s death, she took the habit and was a religious repented of what she had done. : WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  iii.100.32-101.10
Campaigning (1)
 Wilfrid 2-Ecgfrith 4.conflict: So long as the blessed Æthelthryth 2 shared Ecgfrith 4's bed, she strove to keep Wilfrid 2 on good terms with her husband. But Ecgfrith 4's new wife, Eormenburg 1, stirred up hostility to the bishop on the grounds of his great wealth and influence. On hearing that, Archbishop Theodore 1 took measures against Wilfrid 2. Wilfrid 2 went to the Continent to appeal to the pope. In his absence Æthelred 2, king of the Mercians and Wulfhere 1's brother, began a campaign against the Northumbrians to avenge the injuries done to his brother. He put Ecgfrith 4 to flight, slaying his brother Ælfwine 4. Æthelred 2 then banished Bishop Wynnfrith 1, successor of Chad 1 at Lichfield, because he had favoured Ecgfrith 4. Wynnfrith 1, driven by chance on to the coast of the Gaul, came upon King Theoderic 2 and Ebroin 1 duke of the Franks. They had received instructions from Britain to seize and despoil Bishop Wilfrid 2. Mistaken by the name, they killed Wynnfrith 1's company, Anonymi 337 and took away his property, though they let him get away. Meanwhile, Wilfrid 2 befriended Aldgisl 1 and converted him to Christianity; then he moved to Dagobert 3. Dagobert 3 offered Wilfrid 2 the see of Strasbourg, but the latter put off an answer till he should come back from Rome, and Dagobert 3 sent him freely on his way in the company of bishop Deodatus 1. On their way they encountered Perctarit 1, who first wanted to harm Wilfrid 2, but when he heard the true story he helped Wilfrid 2 to crown his business with success. Finally, he arrived to Rome. There had arrived earlier from Theodore 1 a monk of impeccable devoutness, one Cenwald 1, with written accusations against the bishop. Disturbed by this, Pope Agatho 2 summoned a council of fifty bishops and abbots. Andrew 1 and John 10 were present; John 12 kept the records. The council decided that Wilfrid 2's bishopric should be restored to him. Wilfrid 2 then returned to Britain, obtained audience of Ecgfrith 4 and gave him the papal decree. The king, however, showed no respect for the see of Rome, robbed the bishop of his property and handed him over to a certain reeve Osfrith 2, a man notorious for his cruelty. The court itched to do Wilfrid 2 some injury, and Eormenburg 1 went as far as to seize the bishop’s reliquary from him by force and carried it around, relics and all, on her neck or in her carriage. Osfrith 2 put the bishop into a dark prison, but through its darkness a light burst to shine on Wilfrid 2. The reeve was in fear when he heard about it, but he was even more afraid of Ecgfrith 4. Meanwhile his wife [Æbbe 1] grew very ill, first foaming at the mouth and then becoming paralyzed; Osfrith 2 threw himself at the bishop’s feet, and his wife’s health was restored; he then begged the king not to impose on him the guilt of punishing the innocent bishop. Ecgfrith 4 then passed Wilfrid 2 on to a more cruel man called Tydlin 1, who ordered the bishop to be chained – but the chains kept slipping off Wilfrid 2’s hands. The king and his wife continued to ignore these signs and treated the bishop with scorn and hostility, keeping him under arrest. But one night, on a visit from Ecgfrith 4’s aunt, Abbess Æbbe 2, Eormenburg 1 was seized with the Devil. The abbess understood what had happened and prevailed upon her nephew to restore the blessed man’s reliquary. To restore his spouse’s health, the king had to allow Wilfrid 2 to go free. The queen made a good recovery; later, after her husband’s death, she took the habit and was a religious repented of what she had done. : WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  iii.100.32-101.10
Capture (1)
 Wilfrid 2-Ecgfrith 4.conflict: So long as the blessed Æthelthryth 2 shared Ecgfrith 4's bed, she strove to keep Wilfrid 2 on good terms with her husband. But Ecgfrith 4's new wife, Eormenburg 1, stirred up hostility to the bishop on the grounds of his great wealth and influence. On hearing that, Archbishop Theodore 1 took measures against Wilfrid 2. Wilfrid 2 went to the Continent to appeal to the pope. In his absence Æthelred 2, king of the Mercians and Wulfhere 1's brother, began a campaign against the Northumbrians to avenge the injuries done to his brother. He put Ecgfrith 4 to flight, slaying his brother Ælfwine 4. Æthelred 2 then banished Bishop Wynnfrith 1, successor of Chad 1 at Lichfield, because he had favoured Ecgfrith 4. Wynnfrith 1, driven by chance on to the coast of the Gaul, came upon King Theoderic 2 and Ebroin 1 duke of the Franks. They had received instructions from Britain to seize and despoil Bishop Wilfrid 2. Mistaken by the name, they killed Wynnfrith 1's company, Anonymi 337 and took away his property, though they let him get away. Meanwhile, Wilfrid 2 befriended Aldgisl 1 and converted him to Christianity; then he moved to Dagobert 3. Dagobert 3 offered Wilfrid 2 the see of Strasbourg, but the latter put off an answer till he should come back from Rome, and Dagobert 3 sent him freely on his way in the company of bishop Deodatus 1. On their way they encountered Perctarit 1, who first wanted to harm Wilfrid 2, but when he heard the true story he helped Wilfrid 2 to crown his business with success. Finally, he arrived to Rome. There had arrived earlier from Theodore 1 a monk of impeccable devoutness, one Cenwald 1, with written accusations against the bishop. Disturbed by this, Pope Agatho 2 summoned a council of fifty bishops and abbots. Andrew 1 and John 10 were present; John 12 kept the records. The council decided that Wilfrid 2's bishopric should be restored to him. Wilfrid 2 then returned to Britain, obtained audience of Ecgfrith 4 and gave him the papal decree. The king, however, showed no respect for the see of Rome, robbed the bishop of his property and handed him over to a certain reeve Osfrith 2, a man notorious for his cruelty. The court itched to do Wilfrid 2 some injury, and Eormenburg 1 went as far as to seize the bishop’s reliquary from him by force and carried it around, relics and all, on her neck or in her carriage. Osfrith 2 put the bishop into a dark prison, but through its darkness a light burst to shine on Wilfrid 2. The reeve was in fear when he heard about it, but he was even more afraid of Ecgfrith 4. Meanwhile his wife [Æbbe 1] grew very ill, first foaming at the mouth and then becoming paralyzed; Osfrith 2 threw himself at the bishop’s feet, and his wife’s health was restored; he then begged the king not to impose on him the guilt of punishing the innocent bishop. Ecgfrith 4 then passed Wilfrid 2 on to a more cruel man called Tydlin 1, who ordered the bishop to be chained – but the chains kept slipping off Wilfrid 2’s hands. The king and his wife continued to ignore these signs and treated the bishop with scorn and hostility, keeping him under arrest. But one night, on a visit from Ecgfrith 4’s aunt, Abbess Æbbe 2, Eormenburg 1 was seized with the Devil. The abbess understood what had happened and prevailed upon her nephew to restore the blessed man’s reliquary. To restore his spouse’s health, the king had to allow Wilfrid 2 to go free. The queen made a good recovery; later, after her husband’s death, she took the habit and was a religious repented of what she had done. : WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  iii.100.32-101.10
Charter confirmation (1)
 Agatho 2.granting privilege to Eorcenwald 1 for Barking: Agatho 2 granted Eorcenwald 1 a privilege for Barking and confirmed his charters: S1246    (677)
Charter-witnessing (2)
 S66 - Ecgfrith 4 granting land to Cuthbert 1: Ecgfrith 4, king of Northumbria, to Cuthbert 1; grant of land at Crayke, Yorks. N.R., and at Lugubalia (Carlisle): S66    (685)
 S72 - Æthelred 2 granting land to St Peter's, Medeshamstede 1: Æthelred 2, king, to St Peter's Minster, Medeshamstede 1; grant, appended to a bull of Pope Agatho 2, of land at Breedon on the Hill, Leics.; Hrepingas (? Repton, Derbys.); Cedenac; Swineshead, Lincs.; Heanbyrig; Lodeshale; Shifnal, Salop.; Costesford; Stretford (? Stretford, Salop.); Wattlesborough and Lizard, Salop.; Æthelhuniglond (? in Kent); and Bardney, Lincs: S72    (680)
Church/monastery/minster foundation/dedication/restoration (1)
 Biscop 2.foundation of monastery: Biscop 2 built a monastery: Bede.HE  iv.18
Confirmation of land/privileges (4)
 Agatho 2.confirmation by writ of freedom of Medeshamstead: Agatho 2 confirmed [the freedom of Medeshamstead] in writing.: ASC (DEF)  963 E
 Agatho 2.granting privilege to Eorcenwald 1 for Barking: Agatho 2 granted Eorcenwald 1 a privilege for Barking and confirmed his charters: S1246    (677)
 Agatho 2.letter to Æthelred 2, Theodore 1 and Seaxwulf 1: Following Æthelred 2's request, the Agatho 2 sent a privilege for the monastery of Medeshamstede (Peterborough): Agatho.Ep.B48  pp. 74-7 (680)
 Anonymi 1322.confirmation of letter of Agatho 2: They [sc. Anonymi 1322] granted and confirmed completely the letter sent by the pope [sc. Agatho 2].: ASC (E)  675 E
Confiscation (1)
 Wilfrid 2-Ecgfrith 4.conflict: So long as the blessed Æthelthryth 2 shared Ecgfrith 4's bed, she strove to keep Wilfrid 2 on good terms with her husband. But Ecgfrith 4's new wife, Eormenburg 1, stirred up hostility to the bishop on the grounds of his great wealth and influence. On hearing that, Archbishop Theodore 1 took measures against Wilfrid 2. Wilfrid 2 went to the Continent to appeal to the pope. In his absence Æthelred 2, king of the Mercians and Wulfhere 1's brother, began a campaign against the Northumbrians to avenge the injuries done to his brother. He put Ecgfrith 4 to flight, slaying his brother Ælfwine 4. Æthelred 2 then banished Bishop Wynnfrith 1, successor of Chad 1 at Lichfield, because he had favoured Ecgfrith 4. Wynnfrith 1, driven by chance on to the coast of the Gaul, came upon King Theoderic 2 and Ebroin 1 duke of the Franks. They had received instructions from Britain to seize and despoil Bishop Wilfrid 2. Mistaken by the name, they killed Wynnfrith 1's company, Anonymi 337 and took away his property, though they let him get away. Meanwhile, Wilfrid 2 befriended Aldgisl 1 and converted him to Christianity; then he moved to Dagobert 3. Dagobert 3 offered Wilfrid 2 the see of Strasbourg, but the latter put off an answer till he should come back from Rome, and Dagobert 3 sent him freely on his way in the company of bishop Deodatus 1. On their way they encountered Perctarit 1, who first wanted to harm Wilfrid 2, but when he heard the true story he helped Wilfrid 2 to crown his business with success. Finally, he arrived to Rome. There had arrived earlier from Theodore 1 a monk of impeccable devoutness, one Cenwald 1, with written accusations against the bishop. Disturbed by this, Pope Agatho 2 summoned a council of fifty bishops and abbots. Andrew 1 and John 10 were present; John 12 kept the records. The council decided that Wilfrid 2's bishopric should be restored to him. Wilfrid 2 then returned to Britain, obtained audience of Ecgfrith 4 and gave him the papal decree. The king, however, showed no respect for the see of Rome, robbed the bishop of his property and handed him over to a certain reeve Osfrith 2, a man notorious for his cruelty. The court itched to do Wilfrid 2 some injury, and Eormenburg 1 went as far as to seize the bishop’s reliquary from him by force and carried it around, relics and all, on her neck or in her carriage. Osfrith 2 put the bishop into a dark prison, but through its darkness a light burst to shine on Wilfrid 2. The reeve was in fear when he heard about it, but he was even more afraid of Ecgfrith 4. Meanwhile his wife [Æbbe 1] grew very ill, first foaming at the mouth and then becoming paralyzed; Osfrith 2 threw himself at the bishop’s feet, and his wife’s health was restored; he then begged the king not to impose on him the guilt of punishing the innocent bishop. Ecgfrith 4 then passed Wilfrid 2 on to a more cruel man called Tydlin 1, who ordered the bishop to be chained – but the chains kept slipping off Wilfrid 2’s hands. The king and his wife continued to ignore these signs and treated the bishop with scorn and hostility, keeping him under arrest. But one night, on a visit from Ecgfrith 4’s aunt, Abbess Æbbe 2, Eormenburg 1 was seized with the Devil. The abbess understood what had happened and prevailed upon her nephew to restore the blessed man’s reliquary. To restore his spouse’s health, the king had to allow Wilfrid 2 to go free. The queen made a good recovery; later, after her husband’s death, she took the habit and was a religious repented of what she had done. : WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  iii.100.32-101.10
Conspiracy/intent to murder (1)
 Wilfrid 2.attendance at Council of Austerfield: Beorhtwald 6 and other bishops (Anonymi 369) invited Wilfrid 2 to attend. He was warned of their plans by a king's minister [Anonymous 138] and so declined to sign any agreement. : Stephen.VitWilfridi  46-47
Conversion (1)
 Wilfrid 2-Ecgfrith 4.conflict: So long as the blessed Æthelthryth 2 shared Ecgfrith 4's bed, she strove to keep Wilfrid 2 on good terms with her husband. But Ecgfrith 4's new wife, Eormenburg 1, stirred up hostility to the bishop on the grounds of his great wealth and influence. On hearing that, Archbishop Theodore 1 took measures against Wilfrid 2. Wilfrid 2 went to the Continent to appeal to the pope. In his absence Æthelred 2, king of the Mercians and Wulfhere 1's brother, began a campaign against the Northumbrians to avenge the injuries done to his brother. He put Ecgfrith 4 to flight, slaying his brother Ælfwine 4. Æthelred 2 then banished Bishop Wynnfrith 1, successor of Chad 1 at Lichfield, because he had favoured Ecgfrith 4. Wynnfrith 1, driven by chance on to the coast of the Gaul, came upon King Theoderic 2 and Ebroin 1 duke of the Franks. They had received instructions from Britain to seize and despoil Bishop Wilfrid 2. Mistaken by the name, they killed Wynnfrith 1's company, Anonymi 337 and took away his property, though they let him get away. Meanwhile, Wilfrid 2 befriended Aldgisl 1 and converted him to Christianity; then he moved to Dagobert 3. Dagobert 3 offered Wilfrid 2 the see of Strasbourg, but the latter put off an answer till he should come back from Rome, and Dagobert 3 sent him freely on his way in the company of bishop Deodatus 1. On their way they encountered Perctarit 1, who first wanted to harm Wilfrid 2, but when he heard the true story he helped Wilfrid 2 to crown his business with success. Finally, he arrived to Rome. There had arrived earlier from Theodore 1 a monk of impeccable devoutness, one Cenwald 1, with written accusations against the bishop. Disturbed by this, Pope Agatho 2 summoned a council of fifty bishops and abbots. Andrew 1 and John 10 were present; John 12 kept the records. The council decided that Wilfrid 2's bishopric should be restored to him. Wilfrid 2 then returned to Britain, obtained audience of Ecgfrith 4 and gave him the papal decree. The king, however, showed no respect for the see of Rome, robbed the bishop of his property and handed him over to a certain reeve Osfrith 2, a man notorious for his cruelty. The court itched to do Wilfrid 2 some injury, and Eormenburg 1 went as far as to seize the bishop’s reliquary from him by force and carried it around, relics and all, on her neck or in her carriage. Osfrith 2 put the bishop into a dark prison, but through its darkness a light burst to shine on Wilfrid 2. The reeve was in fear when he heard about it, but he was even more afraid of Ecgfrith 4. Meanwhile his wife [Æbbe 1] grew very ill, first foaming at the mouth and then becoming paralyzed; Osfrith 2 threw himself at the bishop’s feet, and his wife’s health was restored; he then begged the king not to impose on him the guilt of punishing the innocent bishop. Ecgfrith 4 then passed Wilfrid 2 on to a more cruel man called Tydlin 1, who ordered the bishop to be chained – but the chains kept slipping off Wilfrid 2’s hands. The king and his wife continued to ignore these signs and treated the bishop with scorn and hostility, keeping him under arrest. But one night, on a visit from Ecgfrith 4’s aunt, Abbess Æbbe 2, Eormenburg 1 was seized with the Devil. The abbess understood what had happened and prevailed upon her nephew to restore the blessed man’s reliquary. To restore his spouse’s health, the king had to allow Wilfrid 2 to go free. The queen made a good recovery; later, after her husband’s death, she took the habit and was a religious repented of what she had done. : WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  iii.100.32-101.10
Correspondence (3)
 Agatho 2-Anonymi 1321 122.letter to England: Agatho 2 and 125 bishops (Anonymi 1321) sent a letter to England in care of Wilfrid 2.: ASC (E)  675 E (p. 37)
 Wilfrid 2.reconciliation with Æthelred 2: Following a letter from Theodore 1, Æthelred 2 was reconciled to Wilfrid 2 and returned many monasteries and estates to him.: Stephen.VitWilfridi  43
 Æthelred 2.communications with Agatho 2: Æthelred 2 made known to Agatho 2 in writing and orally about Medeshamstede.: ASC (E)  675 E (p. 35)
Council-meeting, ecclesiastical (6)
 Agatho 2-others.synod: Agatho 2 called a synod of 125 bishops (Anonymi 685) to testify against those who declared that there was only one will in our Lord. Furthermore, it was decided that Wilfrid 2 had been wrongly accused, and so he was declared worthy to hold his bishopric.: Bede.HE  v.19
 Agatho 2.summoning of synod: Agatho 2 summoned a synod to hear the appeal of Wilfrid 2.: Stephen.VitWilfridi  29 (679)
 Theodore 1-Wilfrid 2.conflict: Theodore 1 expelled Wilfrid 2 wrongfully, and Wilfrid 2 appealed to the pope of Rome, Agatho 2, after being buffeted by many dangers. His appeal was couched in moderate terms: he wished neither to bring charges against the pope's nominee, nor yet to allow his own innocence to be imperilled. these are the words of his memorandum to the pope: 'How has it come about that Theodore 1 should, while I yet lived, in the see which I controlled, ordain three bishops on his own authority, without the consent of any bishop, and against my humble wishes?' Wilfrid 2 was on this occasion adjudged innocent by the Roman council and sent back to his see. But he did not carry his point, thanks to the strong measures of King Ecgfrith 4, particularly as Theodore 1 either purposely obstructed him or let things take their course without interfering. This is also backed up and supported by the letter which Agatho 2 sent to the sixth synod assembled at Constantinople: 'We are hoping to join with our humble self Theodore 1 from Britain, our fellow servant and fellow bishop, archbishop of the great island of Britain, and a lover of wisdom; and this is why we have delayed this council up until now.': WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  i.1.4-7
 Wilfrid 2-Ecgfrith 4.conflict: So long as the blessed Æthelthryth 2 shared Ecgfrith 4's bed, she strove to keep Wilfrid 2 on good terms with her husband. But Ecgfrith 4's new wife, Eormenburg 1, stirred up hostility to the bishop on the grounds of his great wealth and influence. On hearing that, Archbishop Theodore 1 took measures against Wilfrid 2. Wilfrid 2 went to the Continent to appeal to the pope. In his absence Æthelred 2, king of the Mercians and Wulfhere 1's brother, began a campaign against the Northumbrians to avenge the injuries done to his brother. He put Ecgfrith 4 to flight, slaying his brother Ælfwine 4. Æthelred 2 then banished Bishop Wynnfrith 1, successor of Chad 1 at Lichfield, because he had favoured Ecgfrith 4. Wynnfrith 1, driven by chance on to the coast of the Gaul, came upon King Theoderic 2 and Ebroin 1 duke of the Franks. They had received instructions from Britain to seize and despoil Bishop Wilfrid 2. Mistaken by the name, they killed Wynnfrith 1's company, Anonymi 337 and took away his property, though they let him get away. Meanwhile, Wilfrid 2 befriended Aldgisl 1 and converted him to Christianity; then he moved to Dagobert 3. Dagobert 3 offered Wilfrid 2 the see of Strasbourg, but the latter put off an answer till he should come back from Rome, and Dagobert 3 sent him freely on his way in the company of bishop Deodatus 1. On their way they encountered Perctarit 1, who first wanted to harm Wilfrid 2, but when he heard the true story he helped Wilfrid 2 to crown his business with success. Finally, he arrived to Rome. There had arrived earlier from Theodore 1 a monk of impeccable devoutness, one Cenwald 1, with written accusations against the bishop. Disturbed by this, Pope Agatho 2 summoned a council of fifty bishops and abbots. Andrew 1 and John 10 were present; John 12 kept the records. The council decided that Wilfrid 2's bishopric should be restored to him. Wilfrid 2 then returned to Britain, obtained audience of Ecgfrith 4 and gave him the papal decree. The king, however, showed no respect for the see of Rome, robbed the bishop of his property and handed him over to a certain reeve Osfrith 2, a man notorious for his cruelty. The court itched to do Wilfrid 2 some injury, and Eormenburg 1 went as far as to seize the bishop’s reliquary from him by force and carried it around, relics and all, on her neck or in her carriage. Osfrith 2 put the bishop into a dark prison, but through its darkness a light burst to shine on Wilfrid 2. The reeve was in fear when he heard about it, but he was even more afraid of Ecgfrith 4. Meanwhile his wife [Æbbe 1] grew very ill, first foaming at the mouth and then becoming paralyzed; Osfrith 2 threw himself at the bishop’s feet, and his wife’s health was restored; he then begged the king not to impose on him the guilt of punishing the innocent bishop. Ecgfrith 4 then passed Wilfrid 2 on to a more cruel man called Tydlin 1, who ordered the bishop to be chained – but the chains kept slipping off Wilfrid 2’s hands. The king and his wife continued to ignore these signs and treated the bishop with scorn and hostility, keeping him under arrest. But one night, on a visit from Ecgfrith 4’s aunt, Abbess Æbbe 2, Eormenburg 1 was seized with the Devil. The abbess understood what had happened and prevailed upon her nephew to restore the blessed man’s reliquary. To restore his spouse’s health, the king had to allow Wilfrid 2 to go free. The queen made a good recovery; later, after her husband’s death, she took the habit and was a religious repented of what she had done. : WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  iii.100.32-101.10
 Wilfrid 2.attendance at Council of Austerfield: Beorhtwald 6 and other bishops (Anonymi 369) invited Wilfrid 2 to attend. He was warned of their plans by a king's minister [Anonymous 138] and so declined to sign any agreement. : Stephen.VitWilfridi  46-47
 Wilfrid 2.attendance with 125 other bishops (Anonymi 378) at papal council: Wilfrid 2 subscribed to a papal synod also attended by 125 other bishops (Anonymi 378).: Stephen.VitWilfridi  53 (pp. 112, 114) (779)
Deposition of bishop (2)
 Wilfrid 2-Ecgfrith 4.conflict: So long as the blessed Æthelthryth 2 shared Ecgfrith 4's bed, she strove to keep Wilfrid 2 on good terms with her husband. But Ecgfrith 4's new wife, Eormenburg 1, stirred up hostility to the bishop on the grounds of his great wealth and influence. On hearing that, Archbishop Theodore 1 took measures against Wilfrid 2. Wilfrid 2 went to the Continent to appeal to the pope. In his absence Æthelred 2, king of the Mercians and Wulfhere 1's brother, began a campaign against the Northumbrians to avenge the injuries done to his brother. He put Ecgfrith 4 to flight, slaying his brother Ælfwine 4. Æthelred 2 then banished Bishop Wynnfrith 1, successor of Chad 1 at Lichfield, because he had favoured Ecgfrith 4. Wynnfrith 1, driven by chance on to the coast of the Gaul, came upon King Theoderic 2 and Ebroin 1 duke of the Franks. They had received instructions from Britain to seize and despoil Bishop Wilfrid 2. Mistaken by the name, they killed Wynnfrith 1's company, Anonymi 337 and took away his property, though they let him get away. Meanwhile, Wilfrid 2 befriended Aldgisl 1 and converted him to Christianity; then he moved to Dagobert 3. Dagobert 3 offered Wilfrid 2 the see of Strasbourg, but the latter put off an answer till he should come back from Rome, and Dagobert 3 sent him freely on his way in the company of bishop Deodatus 1. On their way they encountered Perctarit 1, who first wanted to harm Wilfrid 2, but when he heard the true story he helped Wilfrid 2 to crown his business with success. Finally, he arrived to Rome. There had arrived earlier from Theodore 1 a monk of impeccable devoutness, one Cenwald 1, with written accusations against the bishop. Disturbed by this, Pope Agatho 2 summoned a council of fifty bishops and abbots. Andrew 1 and John 10 were present; John 12 kept the records. The council decided that Wilfrid 2's bishopric should be restored to him. Wilfrid 2 then returned to Britain, obtained audience of Ecgfrith 4 and gave him the papal decree. The king, however, showed no respect for the see of Rome, robbed the bishop of his property and handed him over to a certain reeve Osfrith 2, a man notorious for his cruelty. The court itched to do Wilfrid 2 some injury, and Eormenburg 1 went as far as to seize the bishop’s reliquary from him by force and carried it around, relics and all, on her neck or in her carriage. Osfrith 2 put the bishop into a dark prison, but through its darkness a light burst to shine on Wilfrid 2. The reeve was in fear when he heard about it, but he was even more afraid of Ecgfrith 4. Meanwhile his wife [Æbbe 1] grew very ill, first foaming at the mouth and then becoming paralyzed; Osfrith 2 threw himself at the bishop’s feet, and his wife’s health was restored; he then begged the king not to impose on him the guilt of punishing the innocent bishop. Ecgfrith 4 then passed Wilfrid 2 on to a more cruel man called Tydlin 1, who ordered the bishop to be chained – but the chains kept slipping off Wilfrid 2’s hands. The king and his wife continued to ignore these signs and treated the bishop with scorn and hostility, keeping him under arrest. But one night, on a visit from Ecgfrith 4’s aunt, Abbess Æbbe 2, Eormenburg 1 was seized with the Devil. The abbess understood what had happened and prevailed upon her nephew to restore the blessed man’s reliquary. To restore his spouse’s health, the king had to allow Wilfrid 2 to go free. The queen made a good recovery; later, after her husband’s death, she took the habit and was a religious repented of what she had done. : WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  iii.100.32-101.10
 Wilfrid 2.ejection from York in a synod: Wilfrid 2's petition to Agatho 2, described how Theodore 1 had consecrated three bishops (Anonymi 331) in spite of Wilfrid 2 opposition.: Stephen.VitWilfridi  30
Education/teaching (1)
 John 13.journey to Britain: John 13 came to Britain from Rome in order that he might teach the monks of St Peter's the mode of chanting throughout the year as it was practised at St Peter's in Rome.: Bede.HE  iv.18
Election of bishop (1)
 Agatho 2.letter to Eorcenwald 1: Following Eorcenwald 1's request, Agatho 2 granted a privilege confirming the monastery's properties and reserving for the monastery community the right to elect the bishop.: Agatho.Ep.B55    (678 x 681)
Episcopal see, acquisition/institution/division/merge (1)
 Agatho 2.letter to Hadrian 2: Following the request of Hadrian 2, Agatho 2 granted an apostolic privilege for the monastery of St Peter and St Paul at Canterbury.: Agatho.Ep.B38    (678)
Exile (1)
 Wilfrid 2.banishment from kingdom of Aldfrith 1: Aldfrith 1 banished Wilfrid 2, whom Æthelred 2 then received. Wilfrid 2 then lived in the bishopric ruled by Seaxwulf 1 before his death.: Stephen.VitWilfridi  45
Expulsion (3)
 Theodore 1-Wilfrid 2.conflict: Theodore 1 expelled Wilfrid 2 wrongfully, and Wilfrid 2 appealed to the pope of Rome, Agatho 2, after being buffeted by many dangers. His appeal was couched in moderate terms: he wished neither to bring charges against the pope's nominee, nor yet to allow his own innocence to be imperilled. these are the words of his memorandum to the pope: 'How has it come about that Theodore 1 should, while I yet lived, in the see which I controlled, ordain three bishops on his own authority, without the consent of any bishop, and against my humble wishes?' Wilfrid 2 was on this occasion adjudged innocent by the Roman council and sent back to his see. But he did not carry his point, thanks to the strong measures of King Ecgfrith 4, particularly as Theodore 1 either purposely obstructed him or let things take their course without interfering. This is also backed up and supported by the letter which Agatho 2 sent to the sixth synod assembled at Constantinople: 'We are hoping to join with our humble self Theodore 1 from Britain, our fellow servant and fellow bishop, archbishop of the great island of Britain, and a lover of wisdom; and this is why we have delayed this council up until now.': WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  i.1.4-7
 Wilfrid 2-Ecgfrith 4.conflict: So long as the blessed Æthelthryth 2 shared Ecgfrith 4's bed, she strove to keep Wilfrid 2 on good terms with her husband. But Ecgfrith 4's new wife, Eormenburg 1, stirred up hostility to the bishop on the grounds of his great wealth and influence. On hearing that, Archbishop Theodore 1 took measures against Wilfrid 2. Wilfrid 2 went to the Continent to appeal to the pope. In his absence Æthelred 2, king of the Mercians and Wulfhere 1's brother, began a campaign against the Northumbrians to avenge the injuries done to his brother. He put Ecgfrith 4 to flight, slaying his brother Ælfwine 4. Æthelred 2 then banished Bishop Wynnfrith 1, successor of Chad 1 at Lichfield, because he had favoured Ecgfrith 4. Wynnfrith 1, driven by chance on to the coast of the Gaul, came upon King Theoderic 2 and Ebroin 1 duke of the Franks. They had received instructions from Britain to seize and despoil Bishop Wilfrid 2. Mistaken by the name, they killed Wynnfrith 1's company, Anonymi 337 and took away his property, though they let him get away. Meanwhile, Wilfrid 2 befriended Aldgisl 1 and converted him to Christianity; then he moved to Dagobert 3. Dagobert 3 offered Wilfrid 2 the see of Strasbourg, but the latter put off an answer till he should come back from Rome, and Dagobert 3 sent him freely on his way in the company of bishop Deodatus 1. On their way they encountered Perctarit 1, who first wanted to harm Wilfrid 2, but when he heard the true story he helped Wilfrid 2 to crown his business with success. Finally, he arrived to Rome. There had arrived earlier from Theodore 1 a monk of impeccable devoutness, one Cenwald 1, with written accusations against the bishop. Disturbed by this, Pope Agatho 2 summoned a council of fifty bishops and abbots. Andrew 1 and John 10 were present; John 12 kept the records. The council decided that Wilfrid 2's bishopric should be restored to him. Wilfrid 2 then returned to Britain, obtained audience of Ecgfrith 4 and gave him the papal decree. The king, however, showed no respect for the see of Rome, robbed the bishop of his property and handed him over to a certain reeve Osfrith 2, a man notorious for his cruelty. The court itched to do Wilfrid 2 some injury, and Eormenburg 1 went as far as to seize the bishop’s reliquary from him by force and carried it around, relics and all, on her neck or in her carriage. Osfrith 2 put the bishop into a dark prison, but through its darkness a light burst to shine on Wilfrid 2. The reeve was in fear when he heard about it, but he was even more afraid of Ecgfrith 4. Meanwhile his wife [Æbbe 1] grew very ill, first foaming at the mouth and then becoming paralyzed; Osfrith 2 threw himself at the bishop’s feet, and his wife’s health was restored; he then begged the king not to impose on him the guilt of punishing the innocent bishop. Ecgfrith 4 then passed Wilfrid 2 on to a more cruel man called Tydlin 1, who ordered the bishop to be chained – but the chains kept slipping off Wilfrid 2’s hands. The king and his wife continued to ignore these signs and treated the bishop with scorn and hostility, keeping him under arrest. But one night, on a visit from Ecgfrith 4’s aunt, Abbess Æbbe 2, Eormenburg 1 was seized with the Devil. The abbess understood what had happened and prevailed upon her nephew to restore the blessed man’s reliquary. To restore his spouse’s health, the king had to allow Wilfrid 2 to go free. The queen made a good recovery; later, after her husband’s death, she took the habit and was a religious repented of what she had done. : WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  iii.100.32-101.10
 Wilfrid 2.banishment from kingdom of Aldfrith 1: Aldfrith 1 banished Wilfrid 2, whom Æthelred 2 then received. Wilfrid 2 then lived in the bishopric ruled by Seaxwulf 1 before his death.: Stephen.VitWilfridi  45
Flight (1)
 Wilfrid 2-Ecgfrith 4.conflict: So long as the blessed Æthelthryth 2 shared Ecgfrith 4's bed, she strove to keep Wilfrid 2 on good terms with her husband. But Ecgfrith 4's new wife, Eormenburg 1, stirred up hostility to the bishop on the grounds of his great wealth and influence. On hearing that, Archbishop Theodore 1 took measures against Wilfrid 2. Wilfrid 2 went to the Continent to appeal to the pope. In his absence Æthelred 2, king of the Mercians and Wulfhere 1's brother, began a campaign against the Northumbrians to avenge the injuries done to his brother. He put Ecgfrith 4 to flight, slaying his brother Ælfwine 4. Æthelred 2 then banished Bishop Wynnfrith 1, successor of Chad 1 at Lichfield, because he had favoured Ecgfrith 4. Wynnfrith 1, driven by chance on to the coast of the Gaul, came upon King Theoderic 2 and Ebroin 1 duke of the Franks. They had received instructions from Britain to seize and despoil Bishop Wilfrid 2. Mistaken by the name, they killed Wynnfrith 1's company, Anonymi 337 and took away his property, though they let him get away. Meanwhile, Wilfrid 2 befriended Aldgisl 1 and converted him to Christianity; then he moved to Dagobert 3. Dagobert 3 offered Wilfrid 2 the see of Strasbourg, but the latter put off an answer till he should come back from Rome, and Dagobert 3 sent him freely on his way in the company of bishop Deodatus 1. On their way they encountered Perctarit 1, who first wanted to harm Wilfrid 2, but when he heard the true story he helped Wilfrid 2 to crown his business with success. Finally, he arrived to Rome. There had arrived earlier from Theodore 1 a monk of impeccable devoutness, one Cenwald 1, with written accusations against the bishop. Disturbed by this, Pope Agatho 2 summoned a council of fifty bishops and abbots. Andrew 1 and John 10 were present; John 12 kept the records. The council decided that Wilfrid 2's bishopric should be restored to him. Wilfrid 2 then returned to Britain, obtained audience of Ecgfrith 4 and gave him the papal decree. The king, however, showed no respect for the see of Rome, robbed the bishop of his property and handed him over to a certain reeve Osfrith 2, a man notorious for his cruelty. The court itched to do Wilfrid 2 some injury, and Eormenburg 1 went as far as to seize the bishop’s reliquary from him by force and carried it around, relics and all, on her neck or in her carriage. Osfrith 2 put the bishop into a dark prison, but through its darkness a light burst to shine on Wilfrid 2. The reeve was in fear when he heard about it, but he was even more afraid of Ecgfrith 4. Meanwhile his wife [Æbbe 1] grew very ill, first foaming at the mouth and then becoming paralyzed; Osfrith 2 threw himself at the bishop’s feet, and his wife’s health was restored; he then begged the king not to impose on him the guilt of punishing the innocent bishop. Ecgfrith 4 then passed Wilfrid 2 on to a more cruel man called Tydlin 1, who ordered the bishop to be chained – but the chains kept slipping off Wilfrid 2’s hands. The king and his wife continued to ignore these signs and treated the bishop with scorn and hostility, keeping him under arrest. But one night, on a visit from Ecgfrith 4’s aunt, Abbess Æbbe 2, Eormenburg 1 was seized with the Devil. The abbess understood what had happened and prevailed upon her nephew to restore the blessed man’s reliquary. To restore his spouse’s health, the king had to allow Wilfrid 2 to go free. The queen made a good recovery; later, after her husband’s death, she took the habit and was a religious repented of what she had done. : WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  iii.100.32-101.10
Freeing captives (1)
 Wilfrid 2-Ecgfrith 4.conflict: So long as the blessed Æthelthryth 2 shared Ecgfrith 4's bed, she strove to keep Wilfrid 2 on good terms with her husband. But Ecgfrith 4's new wife, Eormenburg 1, stirred up hostility to the bishop on the grounds of his great wealth and influence. On hearing that, Archbishop Theodore 1 took measures against Wilfrid 2. Wilfrid 2 went to the Continent to appeal to the pope. In his absence Æthelred 2, king of the Mercians and Wulfhere 1's brother, began a campaign against the Northumbrians to avenge the injuries done to his brother. He put Ecgfrith 4 to flight, slaying his brother Ælfwine 4. Æthelred 2 then banished Bishop Wynnfrith 1, successor of Chad 1 at Lichfield, because he had favoured Ecgfrith 4. Wynnfrith 1, driven by chance on to the coast of the Gaul, came upon King Theoderic 2 and Ebroin 1 duke of the Franks. They had received instructions from Britain to seize and despoil Bishop Wilfrid 2. Mistaken by the name, they killed Wynnfrith 1's company, Anonymi 337 and took away his property, though they let him get away. Meanwhile, Wilfrid 2 befriended Aldgisl 1 and converted him to Christianity; then he moved to Dagobert 3. Dagobert 3 offered Wilfrid 2 the see of Strasbourg, but the latter put off an answer till he should come back from Rome, and Dagobert 3 sent him freely on his way in the company of bishop Deodatus 1. On their way they encountered Perctarit 1, who first wanted to harm Wilfrid 2, but when he heard the true story he helped Wilfrid 2 to crown his business with success. Finally, he arrived to Rome. There had arrived earlier from Theodore 1 a monk of impeccable devoutness, one Cenwald 1, with written accusations against the bishop. Disturbed by this, Pope Agatho 2 summoned a council of fifty bishops and abbots. Andrew 1 and John 10 were present; John 12 kept the records. The council decided that Wilfrid 2's bishopric should be restored to him. Wilfrid 2 then returned to Britain, obtained audience of Ecgfrith 4 and gave him the papal decree. The king, however, showed no respect for the see of Rome, robbed the bishop of his property and handed him over to a certain reeve Osfrith 2, a man notorious for his cruelty. The court itched to do Wilfrid 2 some injury, and Eormenburg 1 went as far as to seize the bishop’s reliquary from him by force and carried it around, relics and all, on her neck or in her carriage. Osfrith 2 put the bishop into a dark prison, but through its darkness a light burst to shine on Wilfrid 2. The reeve was in fear when he heard about it, but he was even more afraid of Ecgfrith 4. Meanwhile his wife [Æbbe 1] grew very ill, first foaming at the mouth and then becoming paralyzed; Osfrith 2 threw himself at the bishop’s feet, and his wife’s health was restored; he then begged the king not to impose on him the guilt of punishing the innocent bishop. Ecgfrith 4 then passed Wilfrid 2 on to a more cruel man called Tydlin 1, who ordered the bishop to be chained – but the chains kept slipping off Wilfrid 2’s hands. The king and his wife continued to ignore these signs and treated the bishop with scorn and hostility, keeping him under arrest. But one night, on a visit from Ecgfrith 4’s aunt, Abbess Æbbe 2, Eormenburg 1 was seized with the Devil. The abbess understood what had happened and prevailed upon her nephew to restore the blessed man’s reliquary. To restore his spouse’s health, the king had to allow Wilfrid 2 to go free. The queen made a good recovery; later, after her husband’s death, she took the habit and was a religious repented of what she had done. : WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  iii.100.32-101.10
Freeing from dues (1)
 Agatho 2.confirmation by writ of freedom of Medeshamstead: Agatho 2 confirmed [the freedom of Medeshamstead] in writing.: ASC (DEF)  963 E
Friendship-making (1)
 Wilfrid 2-Ecgfrith 4.conflict: So long as the blessed Æthelthryth 2 shared Ecgfrith 4's bed, she strove to keep Wilfrid 2 on good terms with her husband. But Ecgfrith 4's new wife, Eormenburg 1, stirred up hostility to the bishop on the grounds of his great wealth and influence. On hearing that, Archbishop Theodore 1 took measures against Wilfrid 2. Wilfrid 2 went to the Continent to appeal to the pope. In his absence Æthelred 2, king of the Mercians and Wulfhere 1's brother, began a campaign against the Northumbrians to avenge the injuries done to his brother. He put Ecgfrith 4 to flight, slaying his brother Ælfwine 4. Æthelred 2 then banished Bishop Wynnfrith 1, successor of Chad 1 at Lichfield, because he had favoured Ecgfrith 4. Wynnfrith 1, driven by chance on to the coast of the Gaul, came upon King Theoderic 2 and Ebroin 1 duke of the Franks. They had received instructions from Britain to seize and despoil Bishop Wilfrid 2. Mistaken by the name, they killed Wynnfrith 1's company, Anonymi 337 and took away his property, though they let him get away. Meanwhile, Wilfrid 2 befriended Aldgisl 1 and converted him to Christianity; then he moved to Dagobert 3. Dagobert 3 offered Wilfrid 2 the see of Strasbourg, but the latter put off an answer till he should come back from Rome, and Dagobert 3 sent him freely on his way in the company of bishop Deodatus 1. On their way they encountered Perctarit 1, who first wanted to harm Wilfrid 2, but when he heard the true story he helped Wilfrid 2 to crown his business with success. Finally, he arrived to Rome. There had arrived earlier from Theodore 1 a monk of impeccable devoutness, one Cenwald 1, with written accusations against the bishop. Disturbed by this, Pope Agatho 2 summoned a council of fifty bishops and abbots. Andrew 1 and John 10 were present; John 12 kept the records. The council decided that Wilfrid 2's bishopric should be restored to him. Wilfrid 2 then returned to Britain, obtained audience of Ecgfrith 4 and gave him the papal decree. The king, however, showed no respect for the see of Rome, robbed the bishop of his property and handed him over to a certain reeve Osfrith 2, a man notorious for his cruelty. The court itched to do Wilfrid 2 some injury, and Eormenburg 1 went as far as to seize the bishop’s reliquary from him by force and carried it around, relics and all, on her neck or in her carriage. Osfrith 2 put the bishop into a dark prison, but through its darkness a light burst to shine on Wilfrid 2. The reeve was in fear when he heard about it, but he was even more afraid of Ecgfrith 4. Meanwhile his wife [Æbbe 1] grew very ill, first foaming at the mouth and then becoming paralyzed; Osfrith 2 threw himself at the bishop’s feet, and his wife’s health was restored; he then begged the king not to impose on him the guilt of punishing the innocent bishop. Ecgfrith 4 then passed Wilfrid 2 on to a more cruel man called Tydlin 1, who ordered the bishop to be chained – but the chains kept slipping off Wilfrid 2’s hands. The king and his wife continued to ignore these signs and treated the bishop with scorn and hostility, keeping him under arrest. But one night, on a visit from Ecgfrith 4’s aunt, Abbess Æbbe 2, Eormenburg 1 was seized with the Devil. The abbess understood what had happened and prevailed upon her nephew to restore the blessed man’s reliquary. To restore his spouse’s health, the king had to allow Wilfrid 2 to go free. The queen made a good recovery; later, after her husband’s death, she took the habit and was a religious repented of what she had done. : WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  iii.100.32-101.10
Grant and Gift (5)
 Agatho 2.granting bull to Medeshamstede 1 S72: Bull of Pope Agatho (678-81) addressed to Æthelred, king of the Mercians, Theodore and Seaxwulf, bishops, granting privileges to the monastery of Medeshamstede 1: S72   
 Agatho 2.letter to Eorcenwald 1: Following Eorcenwald 1's request, Agatho 2 granted a privilege confirming the monastery's properties and reserving for the monastery community the right to elect the bishop.: Agatho.Ep.B55    (678 x 681)
 Agatho 2.letter to Hadrian 2: Following the request of Hadrian 2, Agatho 2 granted an apostolic privilege for the monastery of St Peter and St Paul at Canterbury.: Agatho.Ep.B38    (678)
 S66 - Ecgfrith 4 granting land to Cuthbert 1: Ecgfrith 4, king of Northumbria, to Cuthbert 1; grant of land at Crayke, Yorks. N.R., and at Lugubalia (Carlisle): S66    (685)
 S72 - Æthelred 2 granting land to St Peter's, Medeshamstede 1: Æthelred 2, king, to St Peter's Minster, Medeshamstede 1; grant, appended to a bull of Pope Agatho 2, of land at Breedon on the Hill, Leics.; Hrepingas (? Repton, Derbys.); Cedenac; Swineshead, Lincs.; Heanbyrig; Lodeshale; Shifnal, Salop.; Costesford; Stretford (? Stretford, Salop.); Wattlesborough and Lizard, Salop.; Æthelhuniglond (? in Kent); and Bardney, Lincs: S72    (680)
Healing (1)
 Wilfrid 2-Ecgfrith 4.conflict: So long as the blessed Æthelthryth 2 shared Ecgfrith 4's bed, she strove to keep Wilfrid 2 on good terms with her husband. But Ecgfrith 4's new wife, Eormenburg 1, stirred up hostility to the bishop on the grounds of his great wealth and influence. On hearing that, Archbishop Theodore 1 took measures against Wilfrid 2. Wilfrid 2 went to the Continent to appeal to the pope. In his absence Æthelred 2, king of the Mercians and Wulfhere 1's brother, began a campaign against the Northumbrians to avenge the injuries done to his brother. He put Ecgfrith 4 to flight, slaying his brother Ælfwine 4. Æthelred 2 then banished Bishop Wynnfrith 1, successor of Chad 1 at Lichfield, because he had favoured Ecgfrith 4. Wynnfrith 1, driven by chance on to the coast of the Gaul, came upon King Theoderic 2 and Ebroin 1 duke of the Franks. They had received instructions from Britain to seize and despoil Bishop Wilfrid 2. Mistaken by the name, they killed Wynnfrith 1's company, Anonymi 337 and took away his property, though they let him get away. Meanwhile, Wilfrid 2 befriended Aldgisl 1 and converted him to Christianity; then he moved to Dagobert 3. Dagobert 3 offered Wilfrid 2 the see of Strasbourg, but the latter put off an answer till he should come back from Rome, and Dagobert 3 sent him freely on his way in the company of bishop Deodatus 1. On their way they encountered Perctarit 1, who first wanted to harm Wilfrid 2, but when he heard the true story he helped Wilfrid 2 to crown his business with success. Finally, he arrived to Rome. There had arrived earlier from Theodore 1 a monk of impeccable devoutness, one Cenwald 1, with written accusations against the bishop. Disturbed by this, Pope Agatho 2 summoned a council of fifty bishops and abbots. Andrew 1 and John 10 were present; John 12 kept the records. The council decided that Wilfrid 2's bishopric should be restored to him. Wilfrid 2 then returned to Britain, obtained audience of Ecgfrith 4 and gave him the papal decree. The king, however, showed no respect for the see of Rome, robbed the bishop of his property and handed him over to a certain reeve Osfrith 2, a man notorious for his cruelty. The court itched to do Wilfrid 2 some injury, and Eormenburg 1 went as far as to seize the bishop’s reliquary from him by force and carried it around, relics and all, on her neck or in her carriage. Osfrith 2 put the bishop into a dark prison, but through its darkness a light burst to shine on Wilfrid 2. The reeve was in fear when he heard about it, but he was even more afraid of Ecgfrith 4. Meanwhile his wife [Æbbe 1] grew very ill, first foaming at the mouth and then becoming paralyzed; Osfrith 2 threw himself at the bishop’s feet, and his wife’s health was restored; he then begged the king not to impose on him the guilt of punishing the innocent bishop. Ecgfrith 4 then passed Wilfrid 2 on to a more cruel man called Tydlin 1, who ordered the bishop to be chained – but the chains kept slipping off Wilfrid 2’s hands. The king and his wife continued to ignore these signs and treated the bishop with scorn and hostility, keeping him under arrest. But one night, on a visit from Ecgfrith 4’s aunt, Abbess Æbbe 2, Eormenburg 1 was seized with the Devil. The abbess understood what had happened and prevailed upon her nephew to restore the blessed man’s reliquary. To restore his spouse’s health, the king had to allow Wilfrid 2 to go free. The queen made a good recovery; later, after her husband’s death, she took the habit and was a religious repented of what she had done. : WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  iii.100.32-101.10
Heresy-allegations/condemnations (1)
 Agatho 2-others.synod: Agatho 2 called a synod of 125 bishops (Anonymi 685) to testify against those who declared that there was only one will in our Lord. Furthermore, it was decided that Wilfrid 2 had been wrongly accused, and so he was declared worthy to hold his bishopric.: Bede.HE  v.19
Hostility (1)
 Wilfrid 2-Ecgfrith 4.conflict: So long as the blessed Æthelthryth 2 shared Ecgfrith 4's bed, she strove to keep Wilfrid 2 on good terms with her husband. But Ecgfrith 4's new wife, Eormenburg 1, stirred up hostility to the bishop on the grounds of his great wealth and influence. On hearing that, Archbishop Theodore 1 took measures against Wilfrid 2. Wilfrid 2 went to the Continent to appeal to the pope. In his absence Æthelred 2, king of the Mercians and Wulfhere 1's brother, began a campaign against the Northumbrians to avenge the injuries done to his brother. He put Ecgfrith 4 to flight, slaying his brother Ælfwine 4. Æthelred 2 then banished Bishop Wynnfrith 1, successor of Chad 1 at Lichfield, because he had favoured Ecgfrith 4. Wynnfrith 1, driven by chance on to the coast of the Gaul, came upon King Theoderic 2 and Ebroin 1 duke of the Franks. They had received instructions from Britain to seize and despoil Bishop Wilfrid 2. Mistaken by the name, they killed Wynnfrith 1's company, Anonymi 337 and took away his property, though they let him get away. Meanwhile, Wilfrid 2 befriended Aldgisl 1 and converted him to Christianity; then he moved to Dagobert 3. Dagobert 3 offered Wilfrid 2 the see of Strasbourg, but the latter put off an answer till he should come back from Rome, and Dagobert 3 sent him freely on his way in the company of bishop Deodatus 1. On their way they encountered Perctarit 1, who first wanted to harm Wilfrid 2, but when he heard the true story he helped Wilfrid 2 to crown his business with success. Finally, he arrived to Rome. There had arrived earlier from Theodore 1 a monk of impeccable devoutness, one Cenwald 1, with written accusations against the bishop. Disturbed by this, Pope Agatho 2 summoned a council of fifty bishops and abbots. Andrew 1 and John 10 were present; John 12 kept the records. The council decided that Wilfrid 2's bishopric should be restored to him. Wilfrid 2 then returned to Britain, obtained audience of Ecgfrith 4 and gave him the papal decree. The king, however, showed no respect for the see of Rome, robbed the bishop of his property and handed him over to a certain reeve Osfrith 2, a man notorious for his cruelty. The court itched to do Wilfrid 2 some injury, and Eormenburg 1 went as far as to seize the bishop’s reliquary from him by force and carried it around, relics and all, on her neck or in her carriage. Osfrith 2 put the bishop into a dark prison, but through its darkness a light burst to shine on Wilfrid 2. The reeve was in fear when he heard about it, but he was even more afraid of Ecgfrith 4. Meanwhile his wife [Æbbe 1] grew very ill, first foaming at the mouth and then becoming paralyzed; Osfrith 2 threw himself at the bishop’s feet, and his wife’s health was restored; he then begged the king not to impose on him the guilt of punishing the innocent bishop. Ecgfrith 4 then passed Wilfrid 2 on to a more cruel man called Tydlin 1, who ordered the bishop to be chained – but the chains kept slipping off Wilfrid 2’s hands. The king and his wife continued to ignore these signs and treated the bishop with scorn and hostility, keeping him under arrest. But one night, on a visit from Ecgfrith 4’s aunt, Abbess Æbbe 2, Eormenburg 1 was seized with the Devil. The abbess understood what had happened and prevailed upon her nephew to restore the blessed man’s reliquary. To restore his spouse’s health, the king had to allow Wilfrid 2 to go free. The queen made a good recovery; later, after her husband’s death, she took the habit and was a religious repented of what she had done. : WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  iii.100.32-101.10
Illness/demonic seizure/madness (1)
 Wilfrid 2-Ecgfrith 4.conflict: So long as the blessed Æthelthryth 2 shared Ecgfrith 4's bed, she strove to keep Wilfrid 2 on good terms with her husband. But Ecgfrith 4's new wife, Eormenburg 1, stirred up hostility to the bishop on the grounds of his great wealth and influence. On hearing that, Archbishop Theodore 1 took measures against Wilfrid 2. Wilfrid 2 went to the Continent to appeal to the pope. In his absence Æthelred 2, king of the Mercians and Wulfhere 1's brother, began a campaign against the Northumbrians to avenge the injuries done to his brother. He put Ecgfrith 4 to flight, slaying his brother Ælfwine 4. Æthelred 2 then banished Bishop Wynnfrith 1, successor of Chad 1 at Lichfield, because he had favoured Ecgfrith 4. Wynnfrith 1, driven by chance on to the coast of the Gaul, came upon King Theoderic 2 and Ebroin 1 duke of the Franks. They had received instructions from Britain to seize and despoil Bishop Wilfrid 2. Mistaken by the name, they killed Wynnfrith 1's company, Anonymi 337 and took away his property, though they let him get away. Meanwhile, Wilfrid 2 befriended Aldgisl 1 and converted him to Christianity; then he moved to Dagobert 3. Dagobert 3 offered Wilfrid 2 the see of Strasbourg, but the latter put off an answer till he should come back from Rome, and Dagobert 3 sent him freely on his way in the company of bishop Deodatus 1. On their way they encountered Perctarit 1, who first wanted to harm Wilfrid 2, but when he heard the true story he helped Wilfrid 2 to crown his business with success. Finally, he arrived to Rome. There had arrived earlier from Theodore 1 a monk of impeccable devoutness, one Cenwald 1, with written accusations against the bishop. Disturbed by this, Pope Agatho 2 summoned a council of fifty bishops and abbots. Andrew 1 and John 10 were present; John 12 kept the records. The council decided that Wilfrid 2's bishopric should be restored to him. Wilfrid 2 then returned to Britain, obtained audience of Ecgfrith 4 and gave him the papal decree. The king, however, showed no respect for the see of Rome, robbed the bishop of his property and handed him over to a certain reeve Osfrith 2, a man notorious for his cruelty. The court itched to do Wilfrid 2 some injury, and Eormenburg 1 went as far as to seize the bishop’s reliquary from him by force and carried it around, relics and all, on her neck or in her carriage. Osfrith 2 put the bishop into a dark prison, but through its darkness a light burst to shine on Wilfrid 2. The reeve was in fear when he heard about it, but he was even more afraid of Ecgfrith 4. Meanwhile his wife [Æbbe 1] grew very ill, first foaming at the mouth and then becoming paralyzed; Osfrith 2 threw himself at the bishop’s feet, and his wife’s health was restored; he then begged the king not to impose on him the guilt of punishing the innocent bishop. Ecgfrith 4 then passed Wilfrid 2 on to a more cruel man called Tydlin 1, who ordered the bishop to be chained – but the chains kept slipping off Wilfrid 2’s hands. The king and his wife continued to ignore these signs and treated the bishop with scorn and hostility, keeping him under arrest. But one night, on a visit from Ecgfrith 4’s aunt, Abbess Æbbe 2, Eormenburg 1 was seized with the Devil. The abbess understood what had happened and prevailed upon her nephew to restore the blessed man’s reliquary. To restore his spouse’s health, the king had to allow Wilfrid 2 to go free. The queen made a good recovery; later, after her husband’s death, she took the habit and was a religious repented of what she had done. : WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  iii.100.32-101.10
Imprisonment (1)
 Wilfrid 2-Ecgfrith 4.conflict: So long as the blessed Æthelthryth 2 shared Ecgfrith 4's bed, she strove to keep Wilfrid 2 on good terms with her husband. But Ecgfrith 4's new wife, Eormenburg 1, stirred up hostility to the bishop on the grounds of his great wealth and influence. On hearing that, Archbishop Theodore 1 took measures against Wilfrid 2. Wilfrid 2 went to the Continent to appeal to the pope. In his absence Æthelred 2, king of the Mercians and Wulfhere 1's brother, began a campaign against the Northumbrians to avenge the injuries done to his brother. He put Ecgfrith 4 to flight, slaying his brother Ælfwine 4. Æthelred 2 then banished Bishop Wynnfrith 1, successor of Chad 1 at Lichfield, because he had favoured Ecgfrith 4. Wynnfrith 1, driven by chance on to the coast of the Gaul, came upon King Theoderic 2 and Ebroin 1 duke of the Franks. They had received instructions from Britain to seize and despoil Bishop Wilfrid 2. Mistaken by the name, they killed Wynnfrith 1's company, Anonymi 337 and took away his property, though they let him get away. Meanwhile, Wilfrid 2 befriended Aldgisl 1 and converted him to Christianity; then he moved to Dagobert 3. Dagobert 3 offered Wilfrid 2 the see of Strasbourg, but the latter put off an answer till he should come back from Rome, and Dagobert 3 sent him freely on his way in the company of bishop Deodatus 1. On their way they encountered Perctarit 1, who first wanted to harm Wilfrid 2, but when he heard the true story he helped Wilfrid 2 to crown his business with success. Finally, he arrived to Rome. There had arrived earlier from Theodore 1 a monk of impeccable devoutness, one Cenwald 1, with written accusations against the bishop. Disturbed by this, Pope Agatho 2 summoned a council of fifty bishops and abbots. Andrew 1 and John 10 were present; John 12 kept the records. The council decided that Wilfrid 2's bishopric should be restored to him. Wilfrid 2 then returned to Britain, obtained audience of Ecgfrith 4 and gave him the papal decree. The king, however, showed no respect for the see of Rome, robbed the bishop of his property and handed him over to a certain reeve Osfrith 2, a man notorious for his cruelty. The court itched to do Wilfrid 2 some injury, and Eormenburg 1 went as far as to seize the bishop’s reliquary from him by force and carried it around, relics and all, on her neck or in her carriage. Osfrith 2 put the bishop into a dark prison, but through its darkness a light burst to shine on Wilfrid 2. The reeve was in fear when he heard about it, but he was even more afraid of Ecgfrith 4. Meanwhile his wife [Æbbe 1] grew very ill, first foaming at the mouth and then becoming paralyzed; Osfrith 2 threw himself at the bishop’s feet, and his wife’s health was restored; he then begged the king not to impose on him the guilt of punishing the innocent bishop. Ecgfrith 4 then passed Wilfrid 2 on to a more cruel man called Tydlin 1, who ordered the bishop to be chained – but the chains kept slipping off Wilfrid 2’s hands. The king and his wife continued to ignore these signs and treated the bishop with scorn and hostility, keeping him under arrest. But one night, on a visit from Ecgfrith 4’s aunt, Abbess Æbbe 2, Eormenburg 1 was seized with the Devil. The abbess understood what had happened and prevailed upon her nephew to restore the blessed man’s reliquary. To restore his spouse’s health, the king had to allow Wilfrid 2 to go free. The queen made a good recovery; later, after her husband’s death, she took the habit and was a religious repented of what she had done. : WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  iii.100.32-101.10
Invitation (1)
 Wilfrid 2.attendance at Council of Austerfield: Beorhtwald 6 and other bishops (Anonymi 369) invited Wilfrid 2 to attend. He was warned of their plans by a king's minister [Anonymous 138] and so declined to sign any agreement. : Stephen.VitWilfridi  46-47
Journey (5)
 Biscop 2-Ceolfrith 1 visit to Rome: Biscop 2 went to Rome for the second time.: Bede.HE  iv.18
 John 13.journey to Britain: John 13 came to Britain from Rome in order that he might teach the monks of St Peter's the mode of chanting throughout the year as it was practised at St Peter's in Rome.: Bede.HE  iv.18
 Theodore 1-Wilfrid 2.conflict: Theodore 1 expelled Wilfrid 2 wrongfully, and Wilfrid 2 appealed to the pope of Rome, Agatho 2, after being buffeted by many dangers. His appeal was couched in moderate terms: he wished neither to bring charges against the pope's nominee, nor yet to allow his own innocence to be imperilled. these are the words of his memorandum to the pope: 'How has it come about that Theodore 1 should, while I yet lived, in the see which I controlled, ordain three bishops on his own authority, without the consent of any bishop, and against my humble wishes?' Wilfrid 2 was on this occasion adjudged innocent by the Roman council and sent back to his see. But he did not carry his point, thanks to the strong measures of King Ecgfrith 4, particularly as Theodore 1 either purposely obstructed him or let things take their course without interfering. This is also backed up and supported by the letter which Agatho 2 sent to the sixth synod assembled at Constantinople: 'We are hoping to join with our humble self Theodore 1 from Britain, our fellow servant and fellow bishop, archbishop of the great island of Britain, and a lover of wisdom; and this is why we have delayed this council up until now.': WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  i.1.4-7
 Wilfrid 2-Ecgfrith 4.conflict: So long as the blessed Æthelthryth 2 shared Ecgfrith 4's bed, she strove to keep Wilfrid 2 on good terms with her husband. But Ecgfrith 4's new wife, Eormenburg 1, stirred up hostility to the bishop on the grounds of his great wealth and influence. On hearing that, Archbishop Theodore 1 took measures against Wilfrid 2. Wilfrid 2 went to the Continent to appeal to the pope. In his absence Æthelred 2, king of the Mercians and Wulfhere 1's brother, began a campaign against the Northumbrians to avenge the injuries done to his brother. He put Ecgfrith 4 to flight, slaying his brother Ælfwine 4. Æthelred 2 then banished Bishop Wynnfrith 1, successor of Chad 1 at Lichfield, because he had favoured Ecgfrith 4. Wynnfrith 1, driven by chance on to the coast of the Gaul, came upon King Theoderic 2 and Ebroin 1 duke of the Franks. They had received instructions from Britain to seize and despoil Bishop Wilfrid 2. Mistaken by the name, they killed Wynnfrith 1's company, Anonymi 337 and took away his property, though they let him get away. Meanwhile, Wilfrid 2 befriended Aldgisl 1 and converted him to Christianity; then he moved to Dagobert 3. Dagobert 3 offered Wilfrid 2 the see of Strasbourg, but the latter put off an answer till he should come back from Rome, and Dagobert 3 sent him freely on his way in the company of bishop Deodatus 1. On their way they encountered Perctarit 1, who first wanted to harm Wilfrid 2, but when he heard the true story he helped Wilfrid 2 to crown his business with success. Finally, he arrived to Rome. There had arrived earlier from Theodore 1 a monk of impeccable devoutness, one Cenwald 1, with written accusations against the bishop. Disturbed by this, Pope Agatho 2 summoned a council of fifty bishops and abbots. Andrew 1 and John 10 were present; John 12 kept the records. The council decided that Wilfrid 2's bishopric should be restored to him. Wilfrid 2 then returned to Britain, obtained audience of Ecgfrith 4 and gave him the papal decree. The king, however, showed no respect for the see of Rome, robbed the bishop of his property and handed him over to a certain reeve Osfrith 2, a man notorious for his cruelty. The court itched to do Wilfrid 2 some injury, and Eormenburg 1 went as far as to seize the bishop’s reliquary from him by force and carried it around, relics and all, on her neck or in her carriage. Osfrith 2 put the bishop into a dark prison, but through its darkness a light burst to shine on Wilfrid 2. The reeve was in fear when he heard about it, but he was even more afraid of Ecgfrith 4. Meanwhile his wife [Æbbe 1] grew very ill, first foaming at the mouth and then becoming paralyzed; Osfrith 2 threw himself at the bishop’s feet, and his wife’s health was restored; he then begged the king not to impose on him the guilt of punishing the innocent bishop. Ecgfrith 4 then passed Wilfrid 2 on to a more cruel man called Tydlin 1, who ordered the bishop to be chained – but the chains kept slipping off Wilfrid 2’s hands. The king and his wife continued to ignore these signs and treated the bishop with scorn and hostility, keeping him under arrest. But one night, on a visit from Ecgfrith 4’s aunt, Abbess Æbbe 2, Eormenburg 1 was seized with the Devil. The abbess understood what had happened and prevailed upon her nephew to restore the blessed man’s reliquary. To restore his spouse’s health, the king had to allow Wilfrid 2 to go free. The queen made a good recovery; later, after her husband’s death, she took the habit and was a religious repented of what she had done. : WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  iii.100.32-101.10
 Æthelred 2.despatch of Wilfrid 2 to Agatho 2: In his time he [sc. Æthelred 2] sent Wilfrid 2 to Rome to the pope called Agatho 2.: ASC (E)  675 E (p. 35) (679 x 680)
Judicial decision/review (1)
 Wilfrid 2-Ecgfrith 4.conflict: So long as the blessed Æthelthryth 2 shared Ecgfrith 4's bed, she strove to keep Wilfrid 2 on good terms with her husband. But Ecgfrith 4's new wife, Eormenburg 1, stirred up hostility to the bishop on the grounds of his great wealth and influence. On hearing that, Archbishop Theodore 1 took measures against Wilfrid 2. Wilfrid 2 went to the Continent to appeal to the pope. In his absence Æthelred 2, king of the Mercians and Wulfhere 1's brother, began a campaign against the Northumbrians to avenge the injuries done to his brother. He put Ecgfrith 4 to flight, slaying his brother Ælfwine 4. Æthelred 2 then banished Bishop Wynnfrith 1, successor of Chad 1 at Lichfield, because he had favoured Ecgfrith 4. Wynnfrith 1, driven by chance on to the coast of the Gaul, came upon King Theoderic 2 and Ebroin 1 duke of the Franks. They had received instructions from Britain to seize and despoil Bishop Wilfrid 2. Mistaken by the name, they killed Wynnfrith 1's company, Anonymi 337 and took away his property, though they let him get away. Meanwhile, Wilfrid 2 befriended Aldgisl 1 and converted him to Christianity; then he moved to Dagobert 3. Dagobert 3 offered Wilfrid 2 the see of Strasbourg, but the latter put off an answer till he should come back from Rome, and Dagobert 3 sent him freely on his way in the company of bishop Deodatus 1. On their way they encountered Perctarit 1, who first wanted to harm Wilfrid 2, but when he heard the true story he helped Wilfrid 2 to crown his business with success. Finally, he arrived to Rome. There had arrived earlier from Theodore 1 a monk of impeccable devoutness, one Cenwald 1, with written accusations against the bishop. Disturbed by this, Pope Agatho 2 summoned a council of fifty bishops and abbots. Andrew 1 and John 10 were present; John 12 kept the records. The council decided that Wilfrid 2's bishopric should be restored to him. Wilfrid 2 then returned to Britain, obtained audience of Ecgfrith 4 and gave him the papal decree. The king, however, showed no respect for the see of Rome, robbed the bishop of his property and handed him over to a certain reeve Osfrith 2, a man notorious for his cruelty. The court itched to do Wilfrid 2 some injury, and Eormenburg 1 went as far as to seize the bishop’s reliquary from him by force and carried it around, relics and all, on her neck or in her carriage. Osfrith 2 put the bishop into a dark prison, but through its darkness a light burst to shine on Wilfrid 2. The reeve was in fear when he heard about it, but he was even more afraid of Ecgfrith 4. Meanwhile his wife [Æbbe 1] grew very ill, first foaming at the mouth and then becoming paralyzed; Osfrith 2 threw himself at the bishop’s feet, and his wife’s health was restored; he then begged the king not to impose on him the guilt of punishing the innocent bishop. Ecgfrith 4 then passed Wilfrid 2 on to a more cruel man called Tydlin 1, who ordered the bishop to be chained – but the chains kept slipping off Wilfrid 2’s hands. The king and his wife continued to ignore these signs and treated the bishop with scorn and hostility, keeping him under arrest. But one night, on a visit from Ecgfrith 4’s aunt, Abbess Æbbe 2, Eormenburg 1 was seized with the Devil. The abbess understood what had happened and prevailed upon her nephew to restore the blessed man’s reliquary. To restore his spouse’s health, the king had to allow Wilfrid 2 to go free. The queen made a good recovery; later, after her husband’s death, she took the habit and was a religious repented of what she had done. : WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  iii.100.32-101.10
Killing/murder (1)
 Wilfrid 2-Ecgfrith 4.conflict: So long as the blessed Æthelthryth 2 shared Ecgfrith 4's bed, she strove to keep Wilfrid 2 on good terms with her husband. But Ecgfrith 4's new wife, Eormenburg 1, stirred up hostility to the bishop on the grounds of his great wealth and influence. On hearing that, Archbishop Theodore 1 took measures against Wilfrid 2. Wilfrid 2 went to the Continent to appeal to the pope. In his absence Æthelred 2, king of the Mercians and Wulfhere 1's brother, began a campaign against the Northumbrians to avenge the injuries done to his brother. He put Ecgfrith 4 to flight, slaying his brother Ælfwine 4. Æthelred 2 then banished Bishop Wynnfrith 1, successor of Chad 1 at Lichfield, because he had favoured Ecgfrith 4. Wynnfrith 1, driven by chance on to the coast of the Gaul, came upon King Theoderic 2 and Ebroin 1 duke of the Franks. They had received instructions from Britain to seize and despoil Bishop Wilfrid 2. Mistaken by the name, they killed Wynnfrith 1's company, Anonymi 337 and took away his property, though they let him get away. Meanwhile, Wilfrid 2 befriended Aldgisl 1 and converted him to Christianity; then he moved to Dagobert 3. Dagobert 3 offered Wilfrid 2 the see of Strasbourg, but the latter put off an answer till he should come back from Rome, and Dagobert 3 sent him freely on his way in the company of bishop Deodatus 1. On their way they encountered Perctarit 1, who first wanted to harm Wilfrid 2, but when he heard the true story he helped Wilfrid 2 to crown his business with success. Finally, he arrived to Rome. There had arrived earlier from Theodore 1 a monk of impeccable devoutness, one Cenwald 1, with written accusations against the bishop. Disturbed by this, Pope Agatho 2 summoned a council of fifty bishops and abbots. Andrew 1 and John 10 were present; John 12 kept the records. The council decided that Wilfrid 2's bishopric should be restored to him. Wilfrid 2 then returned to Britain, obtained audience of Ecgfrith 4 and gave him the papal decree. The king, however, showed no respect for the see of Rome, robbed the bishop of his property and handed him over to a certain reeve Osfrith 2, a man notorious for his cruelty. The court itched to do Wilfrid 2 some injury, and Eormenburg 1 went as far as to seize the bishop’s reliquary from him by force and carried it around, relics and all, on her neck or in her carriage. Osfrith 2 put the bishop into a dark prison, but through its darkness a light burst to shine on Wilfrid 2. The reeve was in fear when he heard about it, but he was even more afraid of Ecgfrith 4. Meanwhile his wife [Æbbe 1] grew very ill, first foaming at the mouth and then becoming paralyzed; Osfrith 2 threw himself at the bishop’s feet, and his wife’s health was restored; he then begged the king not to impose on him the guilt of punishing the innocent bishop. Ecgfrith 4 then passed Wilfrid 2 on to a more cruel man called Tydlin 1, who ordered the bishop to be chained – but the chains kept slipping off Wilfrid 2’s hands. The king and his wife continued to ignore these signs and treated the bishop with scorn and hostility, keeping him under arrest. But one night, on a visit from Ecgfrith 4’s aunt, Abbess Æbbe 2, Eormenburg 1 was seized with the Devil. The abbess understood what had happened and prevailed upon her nephew to restore the blessed man’s reliquary. To restore his spouse’s health, the king had to allow Wilfrid 2 to go free. The queen made a good recovery; later, after her husband’s death, she took the habit and was a religious repented of what she had done. : WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  iii.100.32-101.10
Message-sending (1)
 Theodore 1-Wilfrid 2.conflict: Theodore 1 expelled Wilfrid 2 wrongfully, and Wilfrid 2 appealed to the pope of Rome, Agatho 2, after being buffeted by many dangers. His appeal was couched in moderate terms: he wished neither to bring charges against the pope's nominee, nor yet to allow his own innocence to be imperilled. these are the words of his memorandum to the pope: 'How has it come about that Theodore 1 should, while I yet lived, in the see which I controlled, ordain three bishops on his own authority, without the consent of any bishop, and against my humble wishes?' Wilfrid 2 was on this occasion adjudged innocent by the Roman council and sent back to his see. But he did not carry his point, thanks to the strong measures of King Ecgfrith 4, particularly as Theodore 1 either purposely obstructed him or let things take their course without interfering. This is also backed up and supported by the letter which Agatho 2 sent to the sixth synod assembled at Constantinople: 'We are hoping to join with our humble self Theodore 1 from Britain, our fellow servant and fellow bishop, archbishop of the great island of Britain, and a lover of wisdom; and this is why we have delayed this council up until now.': WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  i.1.4-7
Miracle (1)
 Wilfrid 2-Ecgfrith 4.conflict: So long as the blessed Æthelthryth 2 shared Ecgfrith 4's bed, she strove to keep Wilfrid 2 on good terms with her husband. But Ecgfrith 4's new wife, Eormenburg 1, stirred up hostility to the bishop on the grounds of his great wealth and influence. On hearing that, Archbishop Theodore 1 took measures against Wilfrid 2. Wilfrid 2 went to the Continent to appeal to the pope. In his absence Æthelred 2, king of the Mercians and Wulfhere 1's brother, began a campaign against the Northumbrians to avenge the injuries done to his brother. He put Ecgfrith 4 to flight, slaying his brother Ælfwine 4. Æthelred 2 then banished Bishop Wynnfrith 1, successor of Chad 1 at Lichfield, because he had favoured Ecgfrith 4. Wynnfrith 1, driven by chance on to the coast of the Gaul, came upon King Theoderic 2 and Ebroin 1 duke of the Franks. They had received instructions from Britain to seize and despoil Bishop Wilfrid 2. Mistaken by the name, they killed Wynnfrith 1's company, Anonymi 337 and took away his property, though they let him get away. Meanwhile, Wilfrid 2 befriended Aldgisl 1 and converted him to Christianity; then he moved to Dagobert 3. Dagobert 3 offered Wilfrid 2 the see of Strasbourg, but the latter put off an answer till he should come back from Rome, and Dagobert 3 sent him freely on his way in the company of bishop Deodatus 1. On their way they encountered Perctarit 1, who first wanted to harm Wilfrid 2, but when he heard the true story he helped Wilfrid 2 to crown his business with success. Finally, he arrived to Rome. There had arrived earlier from Theodore 1 a monk of impeccable devoutness, one Cenwald 1, with written accusations against the bishop. Disturbed by this, Pope Agatho 2 summoned a council of fifty bishops and abbots. Andrew 1 and John 10 were present; John 12 kept the records. The council decided that Wilfrid 2's bishopric should be restored to him. Wilfrid 2 then returned to Britain, obtained audience of Ecgfrith 4 and gave him the papal decree. The king, however, showed no respect for the see of Rome, robbed the bishop of his property and handed him over to a certain reeve Osfrith 2, a man notorious for his cruelty. The court itched to do Wilfrid 2 some injury, and Eormenburg 1 went as far as to seize the bishop’s reliquary from him by force and carried it around, relics and all, on her neck or in her carriage. Osfrith 2 put the bishop into a dark prison, but through its darkness a light burst to shine on Wilfrid 2. The reeve was in fear when he heard about it, but he was even more afraid of Ecgfrith 4. Meanwhile his wife [Æbbe 1] grew very ill, first foaming at the mouth and then becoming paralyzed; Osfrith 2 threw himself at the bishop’s feet, and his wife’s health was restored; he then begged the king not to impose on him the guilt of punishing the innocent bishop. Ecgfrith 4 then passed Wilfrid 2 on to a more cruel man called Tydlin 1, who ordered the bishop to be chained – but the chains kept slipping off Wilfrid 2’s hands. The king and his wife continued to ignore these signs and treated the bishop with scorn and hostility, keeping him under arrest. But one night, on a visit from Ecgfrith 4’s aunt, Abbess Æbbe 2, Eormenburg 1 was seized with the Devil. The abbess understood what had happened and prevailed upon her nephew to restore the blessed man’s reliquary. To restore his spouse’s health, the king had to allow Wilfrid 2 to go free. The queen made a good recovery; later, after her husband’s death, she took the habit and was a religious repented of what she had done. : WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  iii.100.32-101.10
Monastic life, converting to/joining/oblation (1)
 Wilfrid 2-Ecgfrith 4.conflict: So long as the blessed Æthelthryth 2 shared Ecgfrith 4's bed, she strove to keep Wilfrid 2 on good terms with her husband. But Ecgfrith 4's new wife, Eormenburg 1, stirred up hostility to the bishop on the grounds of his great wealth and influence. On hearing that, Archbishop Theodore 1 took measures against Wilfrid 2. Wilfrid 2 went to the Continent to appeal to the pope. In his absence Æthelred 2, king of the Mercians and Wulfhere 1's brother, began a campaign against the Northumbrians to avenge the injuries done to his brother. He put Ecgfrith 4 to flight, slaying his brother Ælfwine 4. Æthelred 2 then banished Bishop Wynnfrith 1, successor of Chad 1 at Lichfield, because he had favoured Ecgfrith 4. Wynnfrith 1, driven by chance on to the coast of the Gaul, came upon King Theoderic 2 and Ebroin 1 duke of the Franks. They had received instructions from Britain to seize and despoil Bishop Wilfrid 2. Mistaken by the name, they killed Wynnfrith 1's company, Anonymi 337 and took away his property, though they let him get away. Meanwhile, Wilfrid 2 befriended Aldgisl 1 and converted him to Christianity; then he moved to Dagobert 3. Dagobert 3 offered Wilfrid 2 the see of Strasbourg, but the latter put off an answer till he should come back from Rome, and Dagobert 3 sent him freely on his way in the company of bishop Deodatus 1. On their way they encountered Perctarit 1, who first wanted to harm Wilfrid 2, but when he heard the true story he helped Wilfrid 2 to crown his business with success. Finally, he arrived to Rome. There had arrived earlier from Theodore 1 a monk of impeccable devoutness, one Cenwald 1, with written accusations against the bishop. Disturbed by this, Pope Agatho 2 summoned a council of fifty bishops and abbots. Andrew 1 and John 10 were present; John 12 kept the records. The council decided that Wilfrid 2's bishopric should be restored to him. Wilfrid 2 then returned to Britain, obtained audience of Ecgfrith 4 and gave him the papal decree. The king, however, showed no respect for the see of Rome, robbed the bishop of his property and handed him over to a certain reeve Osfrith 2, a man notorious for his cruelty. The court itched to do Wilfrid 2 some injury, and Eormenburg 1 went as far as to seize the bishop’s reliquary from him by force and carried it around, relics and all, on her neck or in her carriage. Osfrith 2 put the bishop into a dark prison, but through its darkness a light burst to shine on Wilfrid 2. The reeve was in fear when he heard about it, but he was even more afraid of Ecgfrith 4. Meanwhile his wife [Æbbe 1] grew very ill, first foaming at the mouth and then becoming paralyzed; Osfrith 2 threw himself at the bishop’s feet, and his wife’s health was restored; he then begged the king not to impose on him the guilt of punishing the innocent bishop. Ecgfrith 4 then passed Wilfrid 2 on to a more cruel man called Tydlin 1, who ordered the bishop to be chained – but the chains kept slipping off Wilfrid 2’s hands. The king and his wife continued to ignore these signs and treated the bishop with scorn and hostility, keeping him under arrest. But one night, on a visit from Ecgfrith 4’s aunt, Abbess Æbbe 2, Eormenburg 1 was seized with the Devil. The abbess understood what had happened and prevailed upon her nephew to restore the blessed man’s reliquary. To restore his spouse’s health, the king had to allow Wilfrid 2 to go free. The queen made a good recovery; later, after her husband’s death, she took the habit and was a religious repented of what she had done. : WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  iii.100.32-101.10
Papal advice/audience/decision/privilege (19)
 Agatho 2.confirmation by writ of freedom of Medeshamstead: Agatho 2 confirmed [the freedom of Medeshamstead] in writing.: ASC (DEF)  963 E
 Agatho 2.giving John 13 the cantor to Biscop 2: At Biscop 2's request, Agatho 2 offered him the services of John 13 the archcantor.: Bede.HistAb  6
 Agatho 2.granting bull to Medeshamstede 1 S72: Bull of Pope Agatho (678-81) addressed to Æthelred, king of the Mercians, Theodore and Seaxwulf, bishops, granting privileges to the monastery of Medeshamstede 1: S72   
 Agatho 2.granting privilege to Biscop 2: a privilege: Anon.VitCeolfrithi  20
 Agatho 2.granting privilege to Eorcenwald 1 for Barking: Agatho 2 granted Eorcenwald 1 a privilege for Barking and confirmed his charters: S1246    (677)
 Agatho 2.granting privilege to St Peter's, Wearmouth: A letter of privileges, protecting the liberty of the monastery of St Peter: Bede.HE  iv.18
 Agatho 2.letter of privilege for Wearmouth: Agatho 2 issued a letter of privilege guaranteeing Wearmouth's perpetual exemption from external interference.: Bede.HistAb  6
 Agatho 2.letter to Eorcenwald 1: Following Eorcenwald 1's request, Agatho 2 granted a privilege confirming the monastery's properties and reserving for the monastery community the right to elect the bishop.: Agatho.Ep.B55    (678 x 681)
 Agatho 2.letter to Hadrian 2: Following the request of Hadrian 2, Agatho 2 granted an apostolic privilege for the monastery of St Peter and St Paul at Canterbury.: Agatho.Ep.B38    (678)
 Agatho 2.letter to Æthelred 2, Theodore 1 and Seaxwulf 1: Following Æthelred 2's request, the Agatho 2 sent a privilege for the monastery of Medeshamstede (Peterborough): Agatho.Ep.B48  pp. 74-7 (680)
 Agatho 2.papal statutes concerning Wilfrid 2: Agatho 2 made a papal decision in favour of Wilfrid 2.: Stephen.VitWilfridi  43, 46
 Agatho 2.second letter to Eorcenwald 1: Following Eorcenwald 1's request, Agatho 2 granted him a privilege for the monastery of Chertsey, which was put under the 'tuitio' of the apostolic see.: Agatho.Ep.B56  pp. 89-91 (678 x 681)
 Eorcenwald 1.visiting Rome: Eorcenwald 1 visited Pope Agatho 2 in Rome and gained a privilege for Barking 1 as described: S1246    (677)
 S72 - Æthelred 2 granting land to St Peter's, Medeshamstede 1: Æthelred 2, king, to St Peter's Minster, Medeshamstede 1; grant, appended to a bull of Pope Agatho 2, of land at Breedon on the Hill, Leics.; Hrepingas (? Repton, Derbys.); Cedenac; Swineshead, Lincs.; Heanbyrig; Lodeshale; Shifnal, Salop.; Costesford; Stretford (? Stretford, Salop.); Wattlesborough and Lizard, Salop.; Æthelhuniglond (? in Kent); and Bardney, Lincs: S72    (680)
 Theodore 1-Wilfrid 2.conflict: Theodore 1 expelled Wilfrid 2 wrongfully, and Wilfrid 2 appealed to the pope of Rome, Agatho 2, after being buffeted by many dangers. His appeal was couched in moderate terms: he wished neither to bring charges against the pope's nominee, nor yet to allow his own innocence to be imperilled. these are the words of his memorandum to the pope: 'How has it come about that Theodore 1 should, while I yet lived, in the see which I controlled, ordain three bishops on his own authority, without the consent of any bishop, and against my humble wishes?' Wilfrid 2 was on this occasion adjudged innocent by the Roman council and sent back to his see. But he did not carry his point, thanks to the strong measures of King Ecgfrith 4, particularly as Theodore 1 either purposely obstructed him or let things take their course without interfering. This is also backed up and supported by the letter which Agatho 2 sent to the sixth synod assembled at Constantinople: 'We are hoping to join with our humble self Theodore 1 from Britain, our fellow servant and fellow bishop, archbishop of the great island of Britain, and a lover of wisdom; and this is why we have delayed this council up until now.': WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  i.1.4-7
 Wilfrid 2-Ecgfrith 4.conflict: So long as the blessed Æthelthryth 2 shared Ecgfrith 4's bed, she strove to keep Wilfrid 2 on good terms with her husband. But Ecgfrith 4's new wife, Eormenburg 1, stirred up hostility to the bishop on the grounds of his great wealth and influence. On hearing that, Archbishop Theodore 1 took measures against Wilfrid 2. Wilfrid 2 went to the Continent to appeal to the pope. In his absence Æthelred 2, king of the Mercians and Wulfhere 1's brother, began a campaign against the Northumbrians to avenge the injuries done to his brother. He put Ecgfrith 4 to flight, slaying his brother Ælfwine 4. Æthelred 2 then banished Bishop Wynnfrith 1, successor of Chad 1 at Lichfield, because he had favoured Ecgfrith 4. Wynnfrith 1, driven by chance on to the coast of the Gaul, came upon King Theoderic 2 and Ebroin 1 duke of the Franks. They had received instructions from Britain to seize and despoil Bishop Wilfrid 2. Mistaken by the name, they killed Wynnfrith 1's company, Anonymi 337 and took away his property, though they let him get away. Meanwhile, Wilfrid 2 befriended Aldgisl 1 and converted him to Christianity; then he moved to Dagobert 3. Dagobert 3 offered Wilfrid 2 the see of Strasbourg, but the latter put off an answer till he should come back from Rome, and Dagobert 3 sent him freely on his way in the company of bishop Deodatus 1. On their way they encountered Perctarit 1, who first wanted to harm Wilfrid 2, but when he heard the true story he helped Wilfrid 2 to crown his business with success. Finally, he arrived to Rome. There had arrived earlier from Theodore 1 a monk of impeccable devoutness, one Cenwald 1, with written accusations against the bishop. Disturbed by this, Pope Agatho 2 summoned a council of fifty bishops and abbots. Andrew 1 and John 10 were present; John 12 kept the records. The council decided that Wilfrid 2's bishopric should be restored to him. Wilfrid 2 then returned to Britain, obtained audience of Ecgfrith 4 and gave him the papal decree. The king, however, showed no respect for the see of Rome, robbed the bishop of his property and handed him over to a certain reeve Osfrith 2, a man notorious for his cruelty. The court itched to do Wilfrid 2 some injury, and Eormenburg 1 went as far as to seize the bishop’s reliquary from him by force and carried it around, relics and all, on her neck or in her carriage. Osfrith 2 put the bishop into a dark prison, but through its darkness a light burst to shine on Wilfrid 2. The reeve was in fear when he heard about it, but he was even more afraid of Ecgfrith 4. Meanwhile his wife [Æbbe 1] grew very ill, first foaming at the mouth and then becoming paralyzed; Osfrith 2 threw himself at the bishop’s feet, and his wife’s health was restored; he then begged the king not to impose on him the guilt of punishing the innocent bishop. Ecgfrith 4 then passed Wilfrid 2 on to a more cruel man called Tydlin 1, who ordered the bishop to be chained – but the chains kept slipping off Wilfrid 2’s hands. The king and his wife continued to ignore these signs and treated the bishop with scorn and hostility, keeping him under arrest. But one night, on a visit from Ecgfrith 4’s aunt, Abbess Æbbe 2, Eormenburg 1 was seized with the Devil. The abbess understood what had happened and prevailed upon her nephew to restore the blessed man’s reliquary. To restore his spouse’s health, the king had to allow Wilfrid 2 to go free. The queen made a good recovery; later, after her husband’s death, she took the habit and was a religious repented of what she had done. : WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  iii.100.32-101.10
 Wilfrid 2.appeal to Agatho 2 in a papal synod: Wilfrid 2 presented a documentary appeal to the pope (Agatho 2), which was examined by ecclesiasts in a papal synod.: Stephen.VitWilfridi  29-33
 Wilfrid 2.initial meeting with Pope Agatho 1: In his petition Wilfrid 2 stated that he had met Agatho 1 in person when he arrived and declared to him that three persons had invaded his bishopric.: Stephen.VitWilfridi  30
 Æthelred 2.despatch of Wilfrid 2 to Agatho 2: In his time he [sc. Æthelred 2] sent Wilfrid 2 to Rome to the pope called Agatho 2.: ASC (E)  675 E (p. 35) (679 x 680)
Reconciliation (1)
 Wilfrid 2.reconciliation with Æthelred 2: Following a letter from Theodore 1, Æthelred 2 was reconciled to Wilfrid 2 and returned many monasteries and estates to him.: Stephen.VitWilfridi  43
Refusal (1)
 Wilfrid 2.attendance at Council of Austerfield: Beorhtwald 6 and other bishops (Anonymi 369) invited Wilfrid 2 to attend. He was warned of their plans by a king's minister [Anonymous 138] and so declined to sign any agreement. : Stephen.VitWilfridi  46-47
Relics-collecting/depositing/granting (1)
 Wilfrid 2-Ecgfrith 4.conflict: So long as the blessed Æthelthryth 2 shared Ecgfrith 4's bed, she strove to keep Wilfrid 2 on good terms with her husband. But Ecgfrith 4's new wife, Eormenburg 1, stirred up hostility to the bishop on the grounds of his great wealth and influence. On hearing that, Archbishop Theodore 1 took measures against Wilfrid 2. Wilfrid 2 went to the Continent to appeal to the pope. In his absence Æthelred 2, king of the Mercians and Wulfhere 1's brother, began a campaign against the Northumbrians to avenge the injuries done to his brother. He put Ecgfrith 4 to flight, slaying his brother Ælfwine 4. Æthelred 2 then banished Bishop Wynnfrith 1, successor of Chad 1 at Lichfield, because he had favoured Ecgfrith 4. Wynnfrith 1, driven by chance on to the coast of the Gaul, came upon King Theoderic 2 and Ebroin 1 duke of the Franks. They had received instructions from Britain to seize and despoil Bishop Wilfrid 2. Mistaken by the name, they killed Wynnfrith 1's company, Anonymi 337 and took away his property, though they let him get away. Meanwhile, Wilfrid 2 befriended Aldgisl 1 and converted him to Christianity; then he moved to Dagobert 3. Dagobert 3 offered Wilfrid 2 the see of Strasbourg, but the latter put off an answer till he should come back from Rome, and Dagobert 3 sent him freely on his way in the company of bishop Deodatus 1. On their way they encountered Perctarit 1, who first wanted to harm Wilfrid 2, but when he heard the true story he helped Wilfrid 2 to crown his business with success. Finally, he arrived to Rome. There had arrived earlier from Theodore 1 a monk of impeccable devoutness, one Cenwald 1, with written accusations against the bishop. Disturbed by this, Pope Agatho 2 summoned a council of fifty bishops and abbots. Andrew 1 and John 10 were present; John 12 kept the records. The council decided that Wilfrid 2's bishopric should be restored to him. Wilfrid 2 then returned to Britain, obtained audience of Ecgfrith 4 and gave him the papal decree. The king, however, showed no respect for the see of Rome, robbed the bishop of his property and handed him over to a certain reeve Osfrith 2, a man notorious for his cruelty. The court itched to do Wilfrid 2 some injury, and Eormenburg 1 went as far as to seize the bishop’s reliquary from him by force and carried it around, relics and all, on her neck or in her carriage. Osfrith 2 put the bishop into a dark prison, but through its darkness a light burst to shine on Wilfrid 2. The reeve was in fear when he heard about it, but he was even more afraid of Ecgfrith 4. Meanwhile his wife [Æbbe 1] grew very ill, first foaming at the mouth and then becoming paralyzed; Osfrith 2 threw himself at the bishop’s feet, and his wife’s health was restored; he then begged the king not to impose on him the guilt of punishing the innocent bishop. Ecgfrith 4 then passed Wilfrid 2 on to a more cruel man called Tydlin 1, who ordered the bishop to be chained – but the chains kept slipping off Wilfrid 2’s hands. The king and his wife continued to ignore these signs and treated the bishop with scorn and hostility, keeping him under arrest. But one night, on a visit from Ecgfrith 4’s aunt, Abbess Æbbe 2, Eormenburg 1 was seized with the Devil. The abbess understood what had happened and prevailed upon her nephew to restore the blessed man’s reliquary. To restore his spouse’s health, the king had to allow Wilfrid 2 to go free. The queen made a good recovery; later, after her husband’s death, she took the habit and was a religious repented of what she had done. : WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  iii.100.32-101.10
Reporting (1)
 Wilfrid 2.ejection from York in a synod: Wilfrid 2's petition to Agatho 2, described how Theodore 1 had consecrated three bishops (Anonymi 331) in spite of Wilfrid 2 opposition.: Stephen.VitWilfridi  30
Request (2)
 Agatho 2.letter to Æthelred 2, Theodore 1 and Seaxwulf 1: Following Æthelred 2's request, the Agatho 2 sent a privilege for the monastery of Medeshamstede (Peterborough): Agatho.Ep.B48  pp. 74-7 (680)
 Agatho 2.second letter to Eorcenwald 1: Following Eorcenwald 1's request, Agatho 2 granted him a privilege for the monastery of Chertsey, which was put under the 'tuitio' of the apostolic see.: Agatho.Ep.B56  pp. 89-91 (678 x 681)
Residence (1)
 Wilfrid 2.banishment from kingdom of Aldfrith 1: Aldfrith 1 banished Wilfrid 2, whom Æthelred 2 then received. Wilfrid 2 then lived in the bishopric ruled by Seaxwulf 1 before his death.: Stephen.VitWilfridi  45
Restoration to bishopric (1)
 Wilfrid 2-Ecgfrith 4.conflict: So long as the blessed Æthelthryth 2 shared Ecgfrith 4's bed, she strove to keep Wilfrid 2 on good terms with her husband. But Ecgfrith 4's new wife, Eormenburg 1, stirred up hostility to the bishop on the grounds of his great wealth and influence. On hearing that, Archbishop Theodore 1 took measures against Wilfrid 2. Wilfrid 2 went to the Continent to appeal to the pope. In his absence Æthelred 2, king of the Mercians and Wulfhere 1's brother, began a campaign against the Northumbrians to avenge the injuries done to his brother. He put Ecgfrith 4 to flight, slaying his brother Ælfwine 4. Æthelred 2 then banished Bishop Wynnfrith 1, successor of Chad 1 at Lichfield, because he had favoured Ecgfrith 4. Wynnfrith 1, driven by chance on to the coast of the Gaul, came upon King Theoderic 2 and Ebroin 1 duke of the Franks. They had received instructions from Britain to seize and despoil Bishop Wilfrid 2. Mistaken by the name, they killed Wynnfrith 1's company, Anonymi 337 and took away his property, though they let him get away. Meanwhile, Wilfrid 2 befriended Aldgisl 1 and converted him to Christianity; then he moved to Dagobert 3. Dagobert 3 offered Wilfrid 2 the see of Strasbourg, but the latter put off an answer till he should come back from Rome, and Dagobert 3 sent him freely on his way in the company of bishop Deodatus 1. On their way they encountered Perctarit 1, who first wanted to harm Wilfrid 2, but when he heard the true story he helped Wilfrid 2 to crown his business with success. Finally, he arrived to Rome. There had arrived earlier from Theodore 1 a monk of impeccable devoutness, one Cenwald 1, with written accusations against the bishop. Disturbed by this, Pope Agatho 2 summoned a council of fifty bishops and abbots. Andrew 1 and John 10 were present; John 12 kept the records. The council decided that Wilfrid 2's bishopric should be restored to him. Wilfrid 2 then returned to Britain, obtained audience of Ecgfrith 4 and gave him the papal decree. The king, however, showed no respect for the see of Rome, robbed the bishop of his property and handed him over to a certain reeve Osfrith 2, a man notorious for his cruelty. The court itched to do Wilfrid 2 some injury, and Eormenburg 1 went as far as to seize the bishop’s reliquary from him by force and carried it around, relics and all, on her neck or in her carriage. Osfrith 2 put the bishop into a dark prison, but through its darkness a light burst to shine on Wilfrid 2. The reeve was in fear when he heard about it, but he was even more afraid of Ecgfrith 4. Meanwhile his wife [Æbbe 1] grew very ill, first foaming at the mouth and then becoming paralyzed; Osfrith 2 threw himself at the bishop’s feet, and his wife’s health was restored; he then begged the king not to impose on him the guilt of punishing the innocent bishop. Ecgfrith 4 then passed Wilfrid 2 on to a more cruel man called Tydlin 1, who ordered the bishop to be chained – but the chains kept slipping off Wilfrid 2’s hands. The king and his wife continued to ignore these signs and treated the bishop with scorn and hostility, keeping him under arrest. But one night, on a visit from Ecgfrith 4’s aunt, Abbess Æbbe 2, Eormenburg 1 was seized with the Devil. The abbess understood what had happened and prevailed upon her nephew to restore the blessed man’s reliquary. To restore his spouse’s health, the king had to allow Wilfrid 2 to go free. The queen made a good recovery; later, after her husband’s death, she took the habit and was a religious repented of what she had done. : WilliamofMalmesbury.GestaPontificumAnglorum  iii.100.32-101.10
Restoration to office (1)
 Agatho 2-others.synod: Agatho 2 called a synod of 125 bishops (Anonymi 685) to testify against those who declared that there was only one will in our Lord. Furthermore, it was decided that Wilfrid 2 had been wrongly accused, and so he was declared worthy to hold his bishopric.: Bede.HE  v.19
Singing/song-composition (1)
 John 13.journey to Britain: John 13 came to Britain from Rome in order that he might teach the monks of St Peter's the mode of chanting throughout the year as it was practised at St Peter's in Rome.: Bede.HE  iv.18
Visit (1)
 Eorcenwald 1.visiting Rome: Eorcenwald 1 visited Pope Agatho 2 in Rome and gained a privilege for Barking 1 as described: S1246    (677)
Factoids linked indirectly to Agatho 2 (7)
Authorship (5)
Theodore 1:  Author of letters sent to Agatho 2 [sc. about Wilfrid 2] (Letter): Stephen.VitWilfridi  29
Wilfrid 2:  Author of writings to Agatho 2 (Letter): Stephen.VitWilfridi  29
Wilfrid 2:  Author of a petition to Agatho 2 against his expulsion from the see of York (Petition): Stephen.VitWilfridi  29-30
Hadrian 2:  Author of a letter to Agatho 2 (Letter): Agatho.Ep.B38   
Æthelred 2:  Author of a petition to Agatho 2, asking for an apostolic privilege for Peterborough (Medeshamstede) (Letter): Agatho.Ep.B48  p. 75
Office (2)
Bishop of Agatho 2 (2)
 Theodore 1: Agatho.Ep.B48  p. 74
 Seaxwulf 1: Agatho.Ep.B48  p. 74