PASE: Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England

Domesday

[Image: Excerpt from the Domesday Book]
[Image: Durham Liber Vitae, folio 38r (extract)]

Othin 9 Othin ‘of Hainton’ (Lincs.), fl. 1066

Male
Author: DWP
Editorial Status: 4 of 5

  Discussion of the name  

Summary

          

Othin 9 held a small manor in north Lincolnshire TRE that, with its sokeland, was assessed at 11 bovates and had a value of 30s.

Distribution map of property and lordships associated with this name in DB

List of property and lordships associated with this name in DB

           

Holder 1066

Shire Phil. ref. Vill Holder 1066 DB Spelling Holder 1066 Lord 1066 Tenant-in-Chief 1086 1086 subtenant Fiscal value 1066 value 1086 value Holder 1066 ID conf. Show on map
Lincolnshire 16,12 Hainton Oudon Othin 'of Hainton' - Roger the Poitevin Hacon 'of Hainton' 1.13 1.23 1.64 D Map
Lincolnshire 16,13 Strubby Othin 'of Hainton' - Roger the Poitevin Hacon 'of Hainton' 0.25 0.27 0.36 D Map
Total               1.38 1.50 2.00  

Profile

   

Othin 9’s small manor was among half a dozen or so little estates at Hainton on the western side of the Lincolnshire Wolds; his manor also had a tiny area of sokeland at Strubby, 4¾ miles to the south of Hainton. There is no obvious connection between Othin and any of the eight other men holding parts of Hainton TRE, although Rolf’s estate also included lands at both Hainton and Strubby.

Othin 10’s name was rare and its form Oudon in DB is similar to the Houden recorded for Othin 10, the TRE holder of land whose soke belonged to Potterhanworth only 9¼ miles to the south-west of Strubby, raising the possibility that they represented the same man. Against this possibility, however, are that Othin 9’s manor was small and in 1086 was not held by either of the tenants-in-chief who appear to have had claims on Othin 10’s land. No certainty is possible here, but the balance of probability is just in favour of regarding Othin 9 and Othin 10 as separate people.

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